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John Jay College Conference to Focus on Immigration and Criminal Justice Policy in the United States

New Research on the Criminalization of Immigrants in Policy and Practice

March 14, 2012, New York, NY – New York City Commissioner of Correction Dora Schriro will be the keynote speaker at the Issues of Immigration in Criminal Justice conference, sponsored by the Center on Race, Crime and Justice at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, on Thursday, March 22, 2012 in room 630, 899 Tenth Avenue, New York City. Leading scholars, public policy and criminal justice practitioners, community advocates and journalists will discuss new and ongoing research on the criminalization of immigrants in justice policy and practice.

“As the current Presidential election campaign underscores once again, immigration remains a contentious issue for many Americans, as well as for our policymakers and elected officials,” said Jeremy Travis, President of John Jay College. “The College is pleased to host an impressive, interdisciplinary group of scholars from across the country in the attempt to illuminate some of the complex dimensions of this important issue.”

Participants will discuss the impact of the rise in immigrant detentions and deportations as well as the pressure on local law enforcement to adhere to stringent state immigration laws. Specific topics that will be addressed include:


  • procedural justice: research on point of service contacts between immigrants and practitioners, particularly law enforcement and immigration enforcement personnel.
  • social justice: research looking at policy effects, intended or otherwise, on immigrants, their families, and the communities in which they live.
  • criminal justice: research that takes a broad view of immigrant crime and the impacts of policy and practice.
  • economic justice: research that raises necessary questions on the local, state, and national contexts in which current policy and practice trends are taking shape.

Among the discussants are:


  • Ramiro Martinez, PhD, and Jacob Stowell, PhD, Northeastern University. Local Context and National Consequences: Homicide Variations Across Time
  • Lindsay N. Marshall, Esq., Executive Director of the Florence Justice Project, Arizona
  • Juan Pedroza, Urban Institute. Removal Roulette: Uneven Immigration Enforcement in “Secure Communities"
  • Rosemary Barberet, PhD, and Diana Rodriguez, John Jay College. Violence Against Migrants, Migrant Workers and Their Families: An International Review of Research
  • Markus Gonzalez Beilfuss, Professor of Constitutional Law, Barcelona University; former Immigration Director General of the Spanish Government
  • Additional participants from CUNY and John Jay faculty including Professors Robert Smith, David Brotherton, Diana Gordon, and Monica Varsanyi.

For more about the Conference, including a full agenda, visit 
http://johnjay.jjay.cuny.edu/_immigrationconference/ 

The Center on Race, Crime and Justice at John Jay College of Criminal Justice is a multifaceted and multidisciplinary entity for exploring critical issues at the intersection of race / ethnicity, crime and justice. Through a visiting scholars program, community partnerships and collaborative efforts within the College and across City University, the Center sponsors activities and conducts funded research aimed at addressing the complex questions that plague our understanding of crime and justice in a diverse society. The Center’s primary mission is to engage in activities that promote equity in justice

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu.