Terrorism and Homeland Security

 

Whether studying domestic or international terrorism, scholars at John Jay College bring a formidable knowledge of history, economics and politics to this important field. In addition to investigating acts of terrorism and their perpetrators, researchers at John Jay are also seeking to understand the needs of victims and first responders.

Desmond Arias (Department of Political Science) Desmond Arias (Department of Political Science) examined the politics of crime and violence in Rio de Janeiro shantytowns. He has published articles on the politics of crime, NGOs, social mobilization, and human rights.

Jana Arsovka (Department of Sociology) and Preeti Chauhan (Department of Psychology) are developing a "High School to Homeland Security Scholarship" program intended to transition students from high school graduates to active and independent undergraduate researchers in homeland security programs.

Scott Atran (Department of Sociology) is a leading expert on suicide terrorism and Al Qaeda. Atran's broadly interdisciplinary studies have appeared in scientific journals in dozens of countries and his work on religion and terrorism has been featured in numerous high profile news articles.

Mucahit Bilici (Department of Sociology) researches Islam in America and is investigating the ways in which Muslim life inhabits various American cultural forms.

Avram Bornstein (Department of Anthropology) researches violence and ethnic conflict and has conducted extensive ethnographic research in Israel-Palestine.

Preeti Chauhan (Department of Psychology) and Jana Arsovka (Department of Sociology) are developing a "High School to Homeland Security Scholarship" program intended to transition students from high school graduates to active and independent undergraduate researchers in homeland security programs.

Joshua Freilich (Department of Criminal Justice) researches the causes of and responses to terrorism. His primary research interest is on right-wing domestic terrorism and is currently the principal investigator (with Steven Chermak) on the United States Extremist Crime Database (ECDB) study, a large-scale data-collection effort that is building the first-of-its-kind relational database of crimes committed by far-right, Al Qaeda directed & influenced, and animal rights and environmental rights extremists in the United States reported in an open source. He is a lead investigator for the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), a Center for Excellence of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

Demis Glasford (Department of Psychology) researches a number of areas including when and why people will actively respond to information about social injustices and ways to reduce intergroup conflict/promote reconciliation.

David Green (Department of Sociology) is co-PI (with Maria Hartwig) on a Department of Homeland Security grant for doctoral research.

Maria "Maki" Haberfeld (Department of Law, Police Science, and Criminal Justice Administration) studies a number of terrorism related issues including maritime terrorism and international contexts.

Maria Hartwig (Department of Psychology) is co-PI (with David Green) on a Department of Homeland Security grant for doctoral research.

Victor Herbert (Department of Protection Management; Director, the Academy for Critical Incident Analysis) studies emergency responders and critical incidents.

Nivedita Majumdar (Department of English) studies nationalism in literature and literary representations of terrorism.

Peter Romaniuk (Department of Political Science) researches international relations, international security, international organizations, terrorism and counter-terrorism, sanctions, regional security in South and Southeast Asia, maritime security, and Australian politics and foreign policy. He has published numerous reports and articles on terrorist financing and United Nations sanctions.

Charles Strozier (Department of Criminal Justice; Director, Center on Terrorism) has studied the psychology of fundamentalism in America and is currently writing a book about the World Trade Center Disaster and its repercussions in American life.

Gregory "Fritz" Umbach (Department of History) is the director of several historical archives including Ground One: Voices from Post-911 Chinatown and The September 11 Digital Archive both recently accessioned by the Library of Congress as that institution's first major digital acquisitions.