Confidentiality

Confidentiality

Federal and state laws prohibit the disclosure of any information you provide us during counseling sessions, unless we have your prior written consent. For example if a family member, a professor, or anyone else should inquire about the services you receive here, we would not disclose any information without your written permission.

Psychological ethical standards and New York State law govern that clients be informed of the professional obligation of confidentiality, the limits of confidentiality and provided informed consent for counseling and psychological services by licensed psychologists and mental health professionals. However, this privilege does not extend to students or unlicensed staff. Nonetheless, all information disclosed during personal counseling sessions remains confidential regardless of the presence or absence of legal privilege.

All counseling contacts with the counseling service are kept in the strictest confidence. Issues discussed with the counselors are in no way permitted to affect a student’s standing at the College. Student visits and conversations do not become part of any other John Jay record other than that of the Counseling Department. No professors or family members will have access to your counseling record unless authorization is provided by the student. There are, however, three exceptions when confidentiality has to be legally broken:

  • if a client is in immediate danger to her/himself or others (e.g. suicide or homicide);
  • if a client or someone the client knows is suspected of child abuse, neglect or maltreatment;
  • if you are under 17 ½ years old, your parents or legal guardian may have access to your counseling records;
  • in legal situations where information may be subpoenaed by the court.

 

All John Jay students can receive counseling without the consent of their family. However, if a student is below the age of 18, their parents have the right to view their records. Also, in some instances when a student is in physical danger of harming her/himself or others, family may be informed.