The Department of History
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Info for Majors   Info for Minors   Prospective Majors   Electives

Requirements for the B.A. in Global History

Requirements: 12 courses (36 units)

Part One- Introduction (9 units)
HIS 203-204-205 Global History Survey

Part Two- Research and Methodology (6 units)
HIS 240 Historiography
HIS 300 Research Methods

Part Three- Chronological Tracks (18 units)
Six electives from Chronological Track (at least two must be at the 300 level)
• Track A = Prehistory to 500 CE
• Track B = 500 CE to 1650 CE
• Track C = 1650 CE to Present

Part Four- Capstone Seminar (3 units)
HIS 425 Senior Seminar in History

Checklist of degree requirements
- use this worksheet to follow your progress through the history requirements

Recommended Timeline for History Majors


Years 1 and 2
HIS 203-204-205 Global History Survey
Chronological Track Electives (when appropriate)

Year 3
HIS 240 Historiography (Fall Semester)
HIS 300 Research Methods (Spring Semester)
Chronological Track Electives

Year 4
HIS 425 Senior Seminar in History
Chronological Track Electives

Course Descriptions for Major Classes

(for descriptions of electives, please click on "electives")


HIS 203 Global History: Prehistory to 500 CE
This course introduces students to critical themes and events in global history that occurred before 500CE. Students consider the major religious movements of the period, the changing meanings of civilization and empire, the emergence of evidence-based thought and systematized reason as alternatives to faith, and the defining cultural collisions and interactions of this long historical epoch. Civilizations and locations covered include Egypt, Mesopotamia, sub-Saharan Africa, India, China, and Europe. Students are examined on all readings either through quizzes or written assignments. Primary and secondary sources are assigned for class discussion, written exercises, and examinations.
Note: this course fulfills one of the General Education requirements in History
Prerequisite or co-requisite: ENG 201

HIS 204 Global History: 500-1650
This course introduces students to the global events, intellectual preoccupations, and institutions that defined the historical period between 500 and 1650. Geographic coverage includes Africa, India, China, Europe, and the Americas; topics covered include Islam, Catholicism, the Reformation, the roots of nation-states as political units, the growth of market economies, colonialism, and competing ways for making sense of the world. Students are examined on all readings either through quizzes or written assignments. Primary and secondary sources are assigned for class discussion, written exercises, and examinations.
Note: this course fulfills one of the General Education requirements in History
Prerequisite or co-requisite: ENG 201

HIS 205 Global History: 1650 - Present
By examining events in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, this course explores the major historical processes that shaped the modern world, including industrialization, the rise of the nation- state, war, colonialism and anti-colonialism, and accelerating global contacts among peoples. The course considers how a globalized world dominated by a few industrialized nations arose, as well as how new and often competing ways of understanding the world took root. Students are examined on all readings either through quizzes or written assignments. Primary and secondary sources are assigned for class discussion, written exercises, and examinations.
Note: this course fulfills one of the General Education requirements in History
Prerequisite or co-requisite: ENG 201

HIS 240 Historiography
The study of history has changed a great deal since the mid-twentieth century, and the scholarly field currently embraces studies in intellectual, world, military, economic, social, and cultural history, as well as more narrowly identified studies in specific fields, such as the history of medicine or the history of war. This class introduces students to the most common approaches to the study of history, including cultural, social, political, economic, gender and sexuality, and military, encouraging them to consider what kind of history each approach values and to understand its strengths and limitations. This course acts as a bridge in the history major, moving students from simply learning history to learning the significant approaches to doing it. By the end of the course, students will understand the plethora of approaches available to studying history, know when to use which approach and why, and be ready to begin historical investigations of their own.
Prerequisites: ENG 101, HIS 203, HIS 204, HIS 205

HIS 300 Research Methods in History
Participating in scholarly historical research requires a set of skills that will allow students to locate, prioritize, analyze, and write about primary sources. Students will learn how to find a variety of different kinds of sources and how to reckon with them once they have been found. It will also expand the knowledge of historiography gained in the previous required course, Historiography, by explaining how to locate secondary sources relevant to a variety of research interests and primary sources. Finally, it will introduce students to the process of contextualizing their research findings in secondary literature and writing a convincing historical argument.
Prerequisites: ENG 102 or ENG 201, HIS 240

HIS 425 Senior Seminar in History
The senior seminar, undertaken by all Global History majors, requires students to synthesize the research, historiographic, and writing skills they have acquired in the major. Drawing on students’ capabilities to engage in independent historical research, and consideration of a wide variety of historiographic approaches, the course offers students from all three chronological tracks the opportunity to engage in research on the same topic and present their work at the departmental seminar. Individual instructors will frame the course based on their particular areas of expertise, but possible topics include slavery, magic, capitalism, and sexuality. All students will complete the course by submitting an independent research paper and presenting their findings to the department in a colloquium.
Prerequisites: ENG 102 or 201, HIS 300, senior standing

 

 
Allison Kavey, Chairperson
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Phone: 212.237.8819, Email: akavey@jjay.cuny.edu