Deryn Strange

Deryn Strange

Associate Professor
Phone number: 
212.484.1345
Room number: 
10.65.14 NB

Education

2006-2008 PostDoc        University of Otago, Psychology
2005 PhD Psychology    Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
2001 BSc Psychology     Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
2000 BA                          Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand (Psychology & Education)

Bio

Dr. Deryn Strange received her PhD in psychology from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, in 2005. Her advisor was Maryanne Garry, PhD. Her thesis was entitled "Factors that Influence Children's False Memories". She arrived at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in September of 2008 and is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology. Her research interests are focused on memory for traumatic events, the techniques that elicit false personal (autobiographical) or false collective memories, and how people acting alone or in larger organizations—such as the media—produce these false memories. 

 

Dr Strange teaches cognitive psychology at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

 

 

 

 

Publications

Indicates that the author is a student.
Takarangi, M. K. T., Strange, D., Shortland, A. E., & James, H. E. (in press). Distinguishing between true and false autobiographical memories for simple actions. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review.

 


Strange, D., &
Hayne, H. (2012). The Devil is in the Detail: Children’s Recollection of Details about their Prior Experiences. Memory (OnlineFirst). DOI: 10.1080/09658211.2012.732722

 


Strange, D.,
& Takarangi, M. (2012). False memories for missing aspects of traumatic events. Acta Psychologica, 141, 322-326.

 


Austin, J., & Strange, D. (2012). Television produces more false recognition for news than newspapers. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 3, 167-175. DOI: 10.1037/a0028322

 


Dysart, J., & Strange, D. (2012). Beliefs about alibis and alibi investigations: A survey of law enforcement. Psychology, Crime and Law, 18, 11-25
. DOI: 10.1080/1068316X.2011.562867

 


Strange, D.,
Garry, M., & Bernstein, D., Lindsay, D. S. (2011). Photographs cause false memories for the news. Acta Psychologica, 136, 90-94. DOI: 10.1016/j.actpsy.2010.10.006.

 


Takarangi., M., & Strange, D. (2010). Emotional impact feedback changes how we remember negative autobiographical experiences. Experimental Psychology, 57, 354-359. DOI: 10.1027/1618-3169/a000042.

 


Strange, D.,
Hoynck Van Papendrecht, H., Crawford, E., Candel, I., & Hayne, H. (2010). Size doesn’t matter: Emotional content does not determine the size of objects in children’s drawings. Psychology, Crime, & Law, 16, 459-476. DOI: 10.1080/10683160902862213.

 


Sugrue, K., Strange, D., & Hayne, H. (2009). False memories in the DRM paradigm: Age-related differences in lure activation and source monitoring. Experimental Psychology, 56, 354-360. DOI: 10.1027/1618-3169.56.5.354.

 


Candel, I., Hayne, H., Strange, D., &
Prevoo, E. (2009). The effect of suggestion on children’s recognition memory for seen and unseen details. Psychology, Crime, & Law, 15, 29-39. DOI: 10.1080/10683160802084850.    
               

Strange, D., Wade, K. A., & Hayne, H. (2008). Creating false memories for events that occurred before versus after the onset of childhood amnesia. Memory, 16, 475-484. DOI: 10.1080/09658210802059049.

 


Strange, D.,
Hayne, H., & Garry, M. (2008). A photo, a suggestion, a false memory. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 22, 587-603. DOI: 10.1002/acp.1390

 


Garry, M., Strange, D., Bernstein, D., & Kinzett, T. (2007). Photographs can distort memory for the news. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 21, 995-1004. DOI:
10.1002/acp.1362. 
Strange, D., & Garry, M. (2007). On cognition and the media. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 21, 979-980. DOI: 10.1002/acp.1392

 


Strange, D.,
Sutherland, R., & Garry, M. (2006). Event plausibility does not affect children’s false memories. Memory, 14, 937-951. DOI: 10.1080/09658210600896105.        


Strange, D.,
Gerrie, M., & Garry, M. (2005). A few seemingly harmless routes to a false memory. Cognitive Processing, 6, 237-242. DOI: 10.1007/s10339-005-0009-7.   


Strange, D.,
Garry, M., & Sutherland, R. (2003). Drawing out children’s false memories. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 17, 607-619. DOI: 10.1002/acp.911.

 

Book Chapters

Strange, D., Clifasefi, S. L., & Garry, M. (2007). False Memories. p. 137-170. In M. Garry & H. Hayne (Eds.), Do justice and let the sky fall: Elizabeth Loftus and her contributions to science, law, and academic freedom. Hillsdale NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

 

Sutherland, R., Strange, D., & Garry, M. (2007). We’ve got the whole child witness thing figured out. Or do we? p. 91-104. In Della Sala, S. (Ed.), Tall tales about the brain: Separating fact from fiction. UK: John Wiley & Sons.

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