Jeremy Travis

Jeremy Travis

President
Phone number: 
212.237.8600
Room number: 
625T

Education

JD      New York University School of Law
MPA   New York University Wagner Graduate School of Public Service
BA     Yale College

Bio

Jeremy Travis became the fourth President of John Jay College of Criminal Justice on August 16, 2004.  Prior to his appointment, President Travis served four years as a Senior Fellow affiliated with the Justice Policy Center at the Urban Institute, a nonpartisan research and policy organization in Washington, DC.  There, he launched a national research program focused on prisoner reentry into society and initiated research agendas on crime in a community context, sentencing and international crime.
From 1994-2000, Travis directed the National Institute of Justice, the research arm of the U.S. Department of Justice.  Nominated by President Clinton and confirmed by the Senate, Travis reinvigorated the agency, managing the growth of its annual budget from $25 million to $120 million.  He established major initiatives to assess crime trends, evaluate federal anti-crime efforts, foster community policing and new law enforcement technologies, advance forensic sciences, and bolster research on counter-terrorism strategies.
Prior to his service in Washington, Travis was Deputy Commissioner for Legal Matters for the New York City Police Department (NYPD) from 1990-1994.  He was Chief Counsel to the U.S. House Judiciary Subcommittee on Criminal Justice in 1990, chaired by then-Rep. Charles E. Schumer.  Travis served as Special Advisor to New York City Mayor Edward I. Koch from 1986-89 and as Assistant Director for Law Enforcement Services for the Mayor’s Office of Operations in 1986.  From 1984-86, he was Special Counsel to the Police Commissioner of the NYPD.
Before joining city government, Travis served as law clerk to then-U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, currently a member of the U.S. Supreme Court, and was the Marden and Marshall Fellow in Criminal Law at New York University School of Law.  Travis was Executive Director of the New York City Criminal Justice Agency from 1977-79 and served six years at the Vera Institute of Justice, where he managed demonstration programs on bail reform, judicial decision making and victim-witness assistance.  He began his career in criminal justice working as a legal services assistant for the Legal Aid Society, New York’s indigent defense agency.
Travis has taught courses on criminal justice, public policy, history and law at Yale College, New York University Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, New York Law School, George Washington University, and John Jay College of Criminal Justice.  He is the author of But They All Come Back: Facing the Challenges of Prisoner Reentry (Urban Institute Press, 2005), co-editor (with Christy Visher) of Prisoner Reentry and Crime in AmericaPrisoners Once Removed: The Impact of Incarceration and Reentry on Children, Families, and Communities (Urban Institute Press, 2003).  He has published numerous book chapters, articles and monographs on constitutional law, criminal law and criminal justice policy.  He is a member of The Committee on Law and Justice of the National Research Council and of the Board of Trustees of the Urban Institute.
(Cambridge University Press, 2005), and co-editor (with Michelle Waul).

Publications

Books and Book Chapters
Travis, J. (2005). But They All Come Back: Facing the Challenges of Prisoner Reentry. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Travis, J., Visher, C. (Eds.) (2005). Prisoner Reentry and Crime in America. New York: Cambridge
University Press.
Travis, J., Visher, C. (2005). Prisoner Reentry and the Pathways to Adulthood: Policy Perspectives. In: D.Wayne Osgood, E. Michael Foster, Constance Flanagan & Gretchen R. Ruth (Eds.). On Your Own Without a Net: The Transition to Adulthood for Vulnerable Populations. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Travis, J. (2004). Building Safe and Just Communities from the Ground Up. In: E. H. Judah & Rev. M. Bryant (Eds.). Criminal Justice: Retribution vs. Restoration. Binghamton, NY: Harworth Press
Travis, J. (2004). Reentry and Reintegration: New Perspectives on the Challenges of Mass Incarceration. In: M. Pattillo, D. Weiman, & B. Western. Imprisoning America: The Social Effects of Mass Incarceration. New York: Russell Sage.
Travis, J., Waul, M. (Eds.) (2003). Prisoners Once Removed: The Effect of Incarceration and Reentry on Children, Families, and Communities. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Travis, J. (2003). Invisible Punishment: An Instrument of Social Exclusion. In: M. Mauer & M. Chesney- Lind (Eds.). Invisible Punishment: The Collateral Consequences of Mass Imprisonment (1-36). New York: The New Press.
Journal Articles
Travis, J. (2007). Reflections on the Reentry Movement. Federal Sentencing Reporter, Vol. 20 (2), pp. 1-4.
Travis, J. (2007). Back-end sentencing: A practice in search of a rationale. Social Research, Vol. 74(2), pp. 631-644.
Travis, J., Christiansen, K. (2006). Failed reentry: The challenges of back-end sentencing. Georgetown Journal on Poverty, Law & Policy, Vol. 13(2), pp. 249-260.
Travis, J. (2006). Defining a research agenda on women and justice in the age of mass incarceration. Women & Criminal Justice, Vol. 17(2/3), pp. 127-136.
Travis, J., Gouvis Roman, C. (2006). Where will I sleep tomorrow? Housing, homelessness, and the returning prisoner. Housing Policy Debate, Vol. 17(2), pp. 389-418.
Travis, J., Sommers, A. (2004). Preface, Journal of Correctional Healthcare, Vol. 10(3), pp. 281-286.
Travis, J. (2004). Building safe and just communities from the ground up. Journal of Religion and
Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought
, Vol. 23(1/2).
Mears, D., Travis, J. (2004). Youth development and reentry. Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, Vol. 2(1).
Travis, J., Visher, C. (2003). Transitions from prison to community: Understanding individual pathways. Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 29, pp. 89-113.
Travis, J., Robinson, L, Solomon, L. (2002). Prisoner reentry: Issues for practice and policy. Criminal Justice 17(1), pp. 12-18.
Travis, J., Lawrence, S. (2002). California’s parole experiment. California Journal, Vol. 33(8), pp. 18-23.
Travis, J., Petersilia, J. (2001). Reentry reconsidered: A new look at an old question. Crime and
Delinquency 47(3), pp. 291.
Travis, J. (2001). But they all come back: Rethinking prisoner reentry. Corrections Management Quarterly, Vol. 5(3), pp. 23-33.
Travis, J. (2001). The challenge of prisoner release: The case of the District of Columbia and its
implications for other jurisdictions. Offender Programs Report: Social and Behavioral Rehabilitation in Prisons, Jails and the Community, Vol. 5(4).
Travis, J. (2001). International strategies for crime prevention in transitional societies: Problems and prospects. Crime and Policing in Transitional Societies, Vol, 8, pp. 229-234.
Travis, J., Robinson, L. (2000). Managing prisoner reentry for public safety. Federal Sentencing Reporter, Vol. 12(5), pp. 258-265.
Travis, J. (2000). Prisons, work and re-entry. Corrections Today, Vol. 61(6), pp. 102-105.
Travis, J. (2000). New challenges in evaluating our sentencing policy: Exploring the public safety nexus. Corrections Compendium.
Travis, J. (1999). Policing in transition. Police Practice and Research, Vol. 1(1), pp. 31-39.
Travis, J. (1998). Declining crime and our national research agenda: A New Yorker’s view. Security
Journal
, Vol. 12(3), pp. 145-150.
Travis, J., Smarrito, W. (1992). A modest proposal to end gun running in America. Fordham Urban LawJournal, Vol. 19(4), pp. 795.
Jacobs, J., Travis, J. (1985). Compliance strategies for draft registration. Arizona Law Review, Vol. 27, pp. 837.
Travis, J. (1982). Rethinking sovereign immunity after Bivens. New York University Law Review, Vol. 57, pp. 597.
Reports and Newspaper Articles
Jeremy Travis (2007). Watch and release. The New York Times, Op-Ed Contributor, Section 14CY, Column 0, p. 11.
Karen Beckman, Kelly Dedel Johnson, Amy L. Solomon, Jeremy Travis. 2004. Prisoner Reentry and Community Policing: Strategies for Enhancing Public Safety. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Amy L. Solomon, Kelly Dedel Johnson, Jeremy Travis, Elizabeth Cincotta McBride. 2004. From Prison to Work: The Employment Dimensions of Prisoner Reentry. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Sarah Lawrence, Jeremy Travis. 2004. The New Landscape of Imprisonment: Mapping America’s Prison Expansion. Washington, D.C.: Urban Press.
Jamie Watson, Amy L. Solomon, Nancy G. LaVigne, Jeremy Travis, Meagan Funches, Barbara
Parthasarathy. 2004. A Portrait of Prisoner Reentry in Texas. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Caterina Gouvis Roman, Jeremy Travis. 2004. Taking Stock: Housing, Homelessness, and Prisoner Reentry. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Daniel P. Mears, Jeremy Travis. 2004. The Dimensions, Pathways, and Consequences of Youth Reentry. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Amy L. Solomon, Michelle Waul, Asheley Van Ness, Jeremy Travis. 2004. Outside the Walls: A National Snapshot of Community-Based Prisoner Reentry Programs. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Christy Visher, Nancy G. LaVigne, Jeremy Travis. 2004. Returning Home: Understanding the Challenges of Prisoner Reentry: Maryland Pilot Study: Findings from Baltimore. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Jeremy Travis, Sinead Keegan, Eric Cadora. 2003. A Portrait of Prisoner Reentry in New Jersey.
Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Nancy G. LaVigne, Cynthia A. Mamalian, Jeremy Travis, Christy Visher. 2003. A Portrait of Prisoner Reentry in Illinois. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Nancy G. LaVigne, Vera Kachnowski, Jeremy Travis, Rebecca Naser, Christy Visher. 2003. A Portrait of Prisoner Reentry in Maryland. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Daniel P. Mears, Gretchen E. Moore, Jeremy Travis, and Laura Winterfield. 2003. Improving the Link Between Research and Drug Treatment in Correctional Settings. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Travis, Jeremy and Sarah Lawrence. 2002. Beyond the Prison Gates: The State of Parole in America. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Travis, Jeremy and Michelle Waul. 2002. Reflections on the Crime Decline in America: Lessons for the Future? Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Lawrence, Sarah, Daniel Mears, Glenn Dubin and Jeremy Travis. 2002. The Practice and Promise of Prison Programming. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Butts, Jeffrey and Jeremy Travis. 2002. The Rise and Fall of Youth Violence in America. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Michelle Waul, Jeremy Travis, Amy L. Solomon. 2002. Background paper: The Effect of Incarceration and Reentry on Children, Families, and Communities. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Butts, Jeffrey, Mark Coggeshall, Caterina Gouvis, Daniel Mears, Jeremy Travis, Michelle Waul, and Ruth White. 2002. Youth, Guns, and the Juvenile Justice System. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press.
Travis, Jeremy, Amy L. Solomon and Michelle Waul. 2001. From Prison to Home: The Dimensions and Consequences of Prisoner Reentry. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute Press.
Travis, Jeremy. (May 15, 2001). With Crime Down, Cops Face New Challenges. Law Enforcement News.
Travis, Jeremy and Amy L. Solomon. 2001. Building Knowledge on Prisoner Reentry. Ohio Department of Corrections Reports.
Travis, Jeremy (March 6, 2001). Cops Cut Crime, Now They Must Build Trust. New York Daily News,
Travis, Jeremy. 2000. Policing Police Misconduct. New York Post, August 14, 2000.
Travis, Jeremy. 2000. But They All Come Back: Rethinking Prisoner Reentry. National Institute of Justice.
Travis, Jeremy, Gerald Lynch and Ellen Schall. 1993. Rethinking School Safety. New York City Board of Education.
Travis, Jeremy and Thomas Doepfner. 1993. Using Subpoenas to Obtain Police Records. New York Law  Journal.

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