John Massey

John Massey

Adjunct Lecturer
Room number: 
8.65.03

Education

B.A. History, Saint Peter's College (May 2008)

M.Phil. History, Graduate Center, CUNY (May 2012)

Bio

John Massey is from Brooklyn, New York. He is a doctoral candidate in the History program at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His dissertation is on the experiences of English Catholic seminarians as explained upon entering the seminary.

When not teaching or writing his dissertation (rare instances), he enjoys running half-marathons or the occasional marathon, drumming with the St. Columcille United Gaelic Pipe Band, traveling to Europe, or watching sports.    

Publications

ARTICLES

BOOK REVIEWS
Massey, John T. “Review: Into the Lion’s Den: The Jesuit Mission in Elizabethan England and Wales, 1580-1603 . Renaissance Quarterly, Vol 67.4, Robert E. Scully, S.J. Into the Lion’s Den: The Jesuit Mission in Elizabethan England and Wales, 1580-1603. St. Louis: Institute of Jesuit Sources, 2001. $32.95. xv + 468 pp. illus. biblio. index. ISBN: 978-1-880810-78-1

Research

Paper Presentations:

Sixteenth Century Society Conference: Bruges, Belgium                                     August 2016
“Recruiting for the Mission? Jesuit Missionaries and English Seminarians, 1589-1610"

Sixteenth Century Society Conference: Vancouver, B.C., Canada                     October 2015
“Spain, Rome, and the English Jesuit Experience: A Case Study of William Holt and the 'English Mission' in the Late Sixteenth Century”

Early Modern Catholics in Britain & Ireland: Integration or Separation?
Ushaw College, Durham University                                                                        July 2015       
“Richard Holtby, S.J.: A Case Study in the Relationship between Continental Seminaries and English Catholic Identity, 1583-1640”

Research interest

Renaissance and Reformation Europe;
Early Modern Catholicism;
Jesuit Missionaries;
English Catholicism;
History of the Jesuits;
Religious Warfare;
History of Mathematics;
History of Diseases and Epidemics;
Transmission of Diseases;
Societal Effects of Death and Disease;
Early Modern Science and Mathematics;
Calculus