Fall 2020 First Year Seminars

Fall 2020 First Year Seminars

Your First Year Seminar (FYS) is a small, hands-on class in which you will work closely with your peers to explore issues of justice. You will be supported by a Student Success Team, which includes your peer success coach, FYS professor, academic advisor, and career specialist. Your success team will be there to answer your questions, support you during your first semester and make sure you are informed about upcoming campus opportunities and events!

  • Choose an Area of Interest that you’d like to explore in your first semester. No need to worry about this decision--your interest may change over time and you should not feel “locked in.”
  • Choose your First Year Seminar. Select your top three First Year Seminars within your desired Area of Interest in preparation for your Advisement session. First Year Seminar seats are first-come, first-served, but there are many options available!
  • Continue exploring in the fall. During the course of the semester, you’ll dive deeper into your initial area of interest AND have the opportunity to explore many other options. By the end of the semester, you will be able to make informed decisions to stick to this area of interest OR consider other ones as you enter your second semester and sophomore year!

 

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR AREAS OF INTEREST
¡Adelante!: Advocacy and Leadership in the Latinx Community
APPLE Corps
Criminal Justice and Public Service
Early Start: Justice Explorations
Honors Program 
Interdisciplinary Studies Program
Law and Policy
Psychology and Human Services

Social Entrepreneurship
Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM)

Teaching and Education

¡ADELANTE!: Advocacy and Leadership in the Latinx Community
great for students with an initial interest in advocacy and leadership in the Latinx Community
¡Adelante! is a comprehensive two-year leadership program that supports the success of students interested in Latinx issues. As an ¡Adelante! leader, you’ll deepen your understanding of issues that impact the Latinx community, receive intensive mentorship to reach your goals, develop skills to create real change, and gain access to a variety of special opportunities (including internships and scholarships). To join, enroll in one of the ¡Adelante! First Year Seminars below and get ready for a life-changing experience. For more information about ¡Adelante!, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu/adelante

The Latina/o Struggle for Inclusion in Higher Education
FY37 LLS 100, TTH 10:50am-12:05pm
Registration code: 2079
Professor Isabel Martinez
FY38 LLS 100, TTH 12:15pm-1:30pm
Registration code: 2081
Professor Isabel Martinez

You got into college—that’s the easy part. Now you have to FINISH!!! Although Latina/os are the fastest growing population enrolling into college, their rates of four-year graduation lag behind other racial/ethnic groups. For many Latina/os who dream of graduating with a Bachelor’s degree, challenges still remain to obtain it. This course will help you become aware of these challenges and examine not only the past and present factors affecting the rates of enrollment and completion of Latina/o college students, but also how Latina/o families and individuals experience college. We will examine how issues like racism, segregation, immigration, etc., impact Latina/o college students in New York City. Special attention will be paid to Latina/o student activism in New York City, including how, in the 1960s and 1970s, Puerto Rican students successfully fought for more Latinas/os to be admitted into CUNY and to establish Puerto Rican Studies (now known as Latina/o Studies) departments across CUNY and at John Jay. You will learn tips about how to be a successful student from guest speakers like CUNY administrators, New York State Youth Leadership Coalition representatives, Latina/o graduate school students and others.

Justice Issues in the New Millennium
FY39 LLS 100, MW 9:25am-10:40am
Registration code: 2080
Professor Maria Dorta
FY40 LLS 100, MW 4:30pm-5:45pm
Registration code: 2906
Professor Maria Dorta

The new Millennium presents a legacy of long fought struggles, as well as some that are unique to new generations, for equal rights and empowerment of different communities and groups in the United States. Our class will discuss the portrayal of people of color in the media, the challenges to binary understandings of gender identity, the role of gangs as sub-cultural groups and many other topics that raise questions about justice. Through fieldwork, guest speakers, group assignments and the creation of e-portfolios, we will create a safe and positive space for dialogue and debate about the justice issues most pressing for our time.

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APPLE CORPS
The APPLE Corps Program has special application requirements.
APPLE Corps provides students interested in social justice issues, public service or law enforcement careers with the opportunity to give back to New York City communities while gaining valuable leadership experiences. For more information about APPLE Corps, visit  www.jjay.cuny.edu/apple-corps

Justice and Communication in Civic Life
FY10 COM 155, TTH 12:15pm-1:30pm
Registration code: 3723
Professor Elton Beckett
FY09 COM 155, TTH 9:25am-10:40am
Registration code: 1436
Professor Elton Beckett
FY11 COM 155, TTH 10:50am-12:05pm
Registration code: 1437
Professor Greg Donaldson

This course provides entering freshmen with the opportunity to learn how engaged citizens have used public speaking to influence the outcomes of a range of political and social justice issues. Students in this class will also learn to use traditional and contemporary methods when presenting their ideas or influencing decisions. Learning to organize ideas and to argue or defend positions is crucial to the relationship between democracy, justice, and public service. Students will also be supported in their transition into the academic and social community at John Jay.

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND PUBLIC SERVICE
great for students with an initial interest in local/federal law enforcement, public safety, and corrections

Justice, the Individual, and Struggle in the African American Experience
FY02 AFR 123, TTH 8:00am-9:15pm
Registration code: 2838
Professor Herbert Johnson
FY04 AFR 123, TTH 9:25am-10:40am
Registration code: 1502
Professor Herbert Johnson

This course provides first year students with an overview of the African American struggle for freedom, justice and equal opportunity from colonial times to the present. By exploring the African origins of African American and the legacies of slavery, reconstruction, Jim Crow, migration/ black urbanization, and the Civil Rights/Black Power movements the course connects ideas of personal freedom and justice to the lives of today’s students. While studying these issues, students will also develop key skills, including critical inquiry, effective writing, communication, peer collaboration, and planning and goal setting.

Justice and Communication in Civic Life
FY12 COM 155, TTH 8:00am-9:15am
Registration code: 1435
Professor Elton Beckett

This course provides entering freshmen with the opportunity to learn how engaged citizens have used public speaking to influence the outcomes of a range of political and social justice issues. Students in this class will also learn to use traditional and contemporary methods when presenting their ideas or influencing decisions. Learning to organize ideas and to argue or defend positions is crucial to the relationship between democracy, justice, and public service. Students will also be supported in their transition into the academic and social community at John Jay.

Crime, Class, Capitalism: The Economics of Justice
FY13 ECO 170, TTH 8:00am-9:15am
Registration code: 3740
Professor Taryn Fivek
FY15 ECO 170, TTH 9:25am-10:40am
Registration code: 3134
Professor Taryn Fivek
FY14 ECO 170, TTH 10:50am-12:05pm
Registration code: 1640
Professor Taryn Fivek

This First Year Seminar examines the connections between capitalism and the criminal justice system in the United States. It investigates the relationships among economic injustice, poverty, wealth, anti-social behavior, crime and the criminal justice system. The course studies how the criminal justice system shapes the lives of individuals from a variety of socioeconomic classes.

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EARLY START: JUSTICE EXPLORATIONS
The Early Start Program has special application requirements.
Early Start gives you the opportunity to take one college course over the summer and meet faculty, staff, and other students before your first semester of college. As an Early Start student, you will complete coursework in math or English to fulfill graduation requirements while you get familiar with campus resources and opportunities at John Jay. For more information about Early Start, visit  www.jjay.cuny.edu/earlystart

Ethical Foundations of the Just Society
FY43 PHI 102, MW 9:25am-10:40am
Registration code: 2198
Professor Genevieve LaForge
FY44 PHI 102, MW 12:15am-1:30pm
Registration code: 2199
Professor Genevieve LaForge

Ethics is the discipline that asks the questions: “what is goodness?” “what is the right thing to do?” and “how do we know it is right?” The course looks at some of the most influential theories of rightness and goodness, and then applies these theories to questions of relevance to the creation and maintenance of a modern, just society, such as: How do we educate people to be good? Is goodness something all humans hold in common, or is it merely the name we give to whatever cultures, groups, societies or individuals judge to be good? Has there been moral progress? And have theories of goodness been properly inclusive of or fair to those who don’t have access to the power to distribute their ideas?

Justice by the Book
FY31 LIT 138, Tuesday (hybrid)
Registration code: 63720
Professor Helen Kapstein

This semester we will be reading The Round House, a novel by Native American writer Louise Erdrich. Although this is a work of fiction it is deeply rooted in the realities of everyday life and the complexities and limitations of the law. The author weaves her knowledge of cultural heritage rights, tribal history, and legal proceedings into the investigation of a crime that threatens to shatter a family. The reader is asked to inhabit a world where “the right thing to do” is not clear and where those who are responsible for achieving justice seem unable to exercise their authority. Our additional readings will include selections from relevant historical and legal documents as well as critical studies of the novel as a call for social and legal activism.

Justice and Heroism
FY32 LIT 135, TTH 9:25am-10:40am
Registration code: 3980
Professor Mark Alpert

The stories we tell define us; the stories we tell about our heroes tell us about our own sense of justice and the way the world is supposed to work. This course will explore how heroes in a range of stories model an ethic of justice and make demands on their audience to pursue that justice. In particular, the course will consider the ways that narrative frames justice and the place of the hero and the anti-hero in advancing and bringing about justice.

The Individual on Trial
FY26 HJS 100, TTH 12;15pm-1:30pm
Registration code: 2977
Professor Andrea Balis

This course considers the individual’s experience of justice through the lens of the trial. Students will study three trials as recorded by historians, imagined by writers, and analyzed by philosophers, exploring events such as the Ossian Sweet trial (1925), the Anita Whitney decision (1927), and the Scopes trial (1925). The course will situate the trials in their cultural and historical contexts as well as encourage students to examine their personal responses to them. While studying these pivotal trials, students will develop their writing and analytical skills as taught in the humanities disciplines of philosophy, literature, and history.

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HONORS PROGRAM
The Honors Program has special application requirements.
The Honors Program at John Jay College brings together academically talented students who have the potential to become tomorrow’s leaders. Working closely with distinguished faculty and advisors in an on-going learning community, students explore the idea of the common good in a sequence of enriched, challenging and interdisciplinary courses. The program emphasizes critical thinking, creativity, and ethical decision-making with attention to global concerns, community responsibility and civic engagement. Students participate in hands-on leader-ship experiences and research pro-jects that address enduring questions of human existence; contemporary questions of social justice, and perspectives from the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. For more information about Honors Program, visit  www.jjay.cuny.edu/honors-program

The Individual on Trial
FY25 HJS 100, TTH 10:50am-12:05pm
Registration code: 2857
Professor Erica Burleigh

This course considers the individual’s experience of justice through the lens of the trial. Students will study three trials as recorded by historians, imagined by writers, and analyzed by philosophers, exploring events such as the Ossian Sweet trial (1925), the Anita Whitney decision (1927), and the Scopes trial (1925). The course will situate the trials in their cultural and historical contexts as well as encourage students to examine their personal responses to them. While studying these pivotal trials, students will develop their writing and analytical skills as taught in the humanities disciplines of philosophy, literature, and history.

Ethical Foundations of the Just Society
FY42 PHI 102, MW 9:25am-10:40am
Registration code: 2196
Professor Sergio Gallegos Ordorica

Ethics is the discipline that asks the questions: “what is goodness?” “what is the right thing to do?” and “how do we know it is right?” The course looks at some of the most influential theories of rightness and goodness, and then applies these theories to questions of relevance to the creation and maintenance of a modern, just society, such as: How do we educate people to be good? Is goodness something all humans hold in common, or is it merely the name we give to whatever cultures, groups, societies or individuals we judge to be good? Has there been moral progress? And have theories of goodness been properly inclusive of or fair to those who don’t have access to the power to distribute their ideas?

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INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES PROGRAM: A UNIQUE ACADEMIC ADVENTURE
When you join the Interdisciplinary Studies Program (ISP), you enter a community dedicated to active learning.  What does that mean?  We support the success of students who want to hear multiple perspectives while sharing their own voice and experience.  You’ll take two or three courses with us, forming an essential network of faculty and friends while jump-starting your Gen Ed. You will take ISP100 plus two additional courses, one of which can be a special ISP-only ENG 101 or MAT 106 class. For Fall 2020, choose the track that best fits your interests, with ISP 100 as your First Year Seminar!

Justice and Fairness
1. FY ISP 100 (Justice: Who’s In and Who’s Out?)
2. ISP 122 (Those People: Stereotyping in America)

Exploration and Adventure
1. FY ISP 100 (Justice: Who’s In and Who’s Out?)
2. ISP 112 (Travel and Transformation)

Personal Identity
1. FY ISP 100 (Justice: Who’s In and Who’s Out?)
2. ISP 147 (Life Stories)

Disaster and Recovery
1. FY ISP 100 (Justice: Who’s In and Who’s Out?)
2. SP 110 (Global Catastrophe)

Who’s In and Who’s Out?
FY29 ISP 100, M 11:00am-1:30pm
Registration code: 24348
Professors Susannah Crowder and Adriana Perez

FY30 ISP 100, M 11:00am-1:30pm
Registration code: 24350
Professors Richard Haw and David Green

FY27 ISP 100, M 11:00am-1:30pm
Registration code: 24349
Professors Remi Brulin and Rose O’Malley   

FY28 ISP 100, M 11:00am-1:30pm
Registration code: 24351
Professors Giazu Encisodominguez and Kofi Scott

Drawing on texts from the humanities and the social sciences, this General Education course will explore how justice—as a word, an ever-changing concept, and a shifting reality—affects and controls individual lives. It will consider such crucial issues as the scope of justice, the definition(s) of what is just, and the problem of how individuals respond to injustice, and it will do so from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Those  People! Stereotyping in America | Justice and Fairness
(US Experience in Its Diversity) 
ISP 122-01, M 8:00am-10:40am
Registration code: 2070
Professors Zeynep Turan and Thomas Giovanni
ISP 122-02, M 3:05pm-5:45pm
Registration code: 2825
Professors Zeynep Turan and Thomas Giovanni

This course examines the origins, history, and psychosocial effects of stereotypes as they are represented in our national culture. Through analysis of representations of group difference in literature, art, drama, and film, students will explore the nature of American stereotypes and the many ways they reflect and shape the political, social, and cultural landscape in the U.S

Life Stories | Personal Identity
(Individual and Society)
ISP 147-01, M 11:00am-1:30pm
Registration code: 2062
Professors Michael Blitz and Shirley Sarna

Our individual life stories are shaped by myriad forces: biological needs; family dynamics; the political, geographical, and socio-economic circumstances in which we find ourselves; historical events; and our own unique quirks, strengths, and failings. By reading memoirs and biographies and writing autobiographical essays of their own, students in this General Education course in the “Individual and Society” area will explore the ways that these forces interact in human lives.

When Nature Roars: Global Catastrophe and Human Responsibility | Disaster and Recovery
(Individual and Society)
ISP 110-01, W 3:05pm-5:45pm
Registration code: 3293
Professors Anna Katsnelson and Zeynep Turan

As much as we like to think of ourselves as masters of the universe, human civilizations exist under threats from the great destructive powers of nature as well as our own capacity for large-scale destruction. This course explores the causes, effects, and consequences of natural and human-made disasters within and across national, regional, and global boundaries, and the moral, ethical, and legal dimensions of preventing and responding to such crises. In addition to factual accounts and studies, the course will consider the ways cataclysmic events are reflected in art, music and literature.

Travel and Transformation | Exploration and Adventure
(World Cultures and Global Issues)
ISP 112-01, TH 8:00am-10:40am
Registration code: 2705
Professors Richard Haw and Giazu Encisodominguez
ISP 112-02, TH 3:05pm-5:45pm
Registration code: 2706
Professors Richard Haw and Giazu Encisodominguez

This course will explore what happens when people travel, when they leave the comfort and security of the familiar and venture into the unknown, to learn, encounter, adapt and clash with new and unfamiliar people and cultures. It will examine the cultural assumptions we bring along when we travel and the racial, ethnic, gender and class perspectives that underpin our notions of the world through which we move. It will interrogate, analyze and critique the narratives we construct about other people, other cultures and other places, and consider how our encounters with other cultures transform us, just as we transform them. This course draws on texts from the humanities and social sciences, and will consider representations of travel in drama, film, literature and the fine arts.

Exploration and Authorship: An Inquiry-Based Writing Course
(College Composition I)
ENG 101 ISP-01, MW 9:25am-10:40am
Registration code: xxxxx
Professor Madhura Bandyopadhyay
ENG 101 ISP-02, TTH 10:50am-12:05pm
Registration code: xxxxx
Professor Madhura Bandyopadhyay
ENG 101 ISP-03, TTH 12:15pm-1:30pm
Registration code: xxxxx
Professor Madhura Bandyopadhyay

This course introduces students to the skills, habits, and conventions necessary to prepare inquiry-based research for college. While offering students techniques and practices of invention and revision, this theme-based composition course teaches students the expectations of college-level research, academic devices for exploring ideas, and rhetorical strategies for completing investigative writing. Students prepare a sequence of prescribed assignments that culminate in a final research paper. These assignments provide small manageable task that explore the process of the normally overwhelming research paper. The course grade is based on the quality of revised writing in a final portfolio.

Liberal Arts Mathematics
(Math and Quantitative Reasoning)
Modality: Online Synchronous mixed

MAT 106 ISP-02, T 10:50am-1:30pm
Registration code: 62527
Professors Valerie Allen (ENG) and Todd Stambaugh (MAT)

In this historic year of covid-19, continued struggles for racial justice, and a presidential election, take this opportunity to learn about the mathematics directly shaping our identity, health, safety, and political choices. Unlike regular math courses, which tend to concentrate on solving problem sets, this particular section (02) focuses also on writing about what happens when we turn human stories into equations and variables. We will think about the losses and gains in moving between the qualitative and quantitative, and why it is important to be able to do so.

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LAW AND POLICY
great for students with an initial interest in law, policymaking, and politics

The Ethnography of Youth and Justice in New York City
FY05 ANT 100, TTH 9:25am-10:40am
Registration code: 1597
Professor Marta-Laura Suska

FY06 ANT 100, TTH 10:50am-12:05pm
Registration code: 2550
Professor Marta-Laura Suska

This First Year Seminar will examine the tensions around justice that exist between young people in New York City and the wider society in which they live. We will ask questions such as: What does it mean to grow up in a world with changing freedoms, restrictions, opportunities and expectations? How do young people try to achieve justice for themselves and others when the rules and the outcomes sometimes seem unfair? We will explore the dynamic of justice and freedom through topics such as sexuality, labor, violence and drugs. In this class you will learn in theory and use in practice the skills that it takes to be a researcher, skills that will be useful for your school years and in your future professional career.

Justice and Heroism
FY34 LIT 135, TH 10:50am-12:05am (hybrid)
Registration code: 2888
Professor Margaret Escher
FY33 LIT 135, TH 12:15pm-1:30pm (hybrid)
Registration code: 2889
Professor Margaret Escher

The stories we tell define us; the stories we tell about our heroes tell us about our own sense of justice and the way the world is supposed to work. This course will explore how heroes in a range of stories model an ethic of justice and make demands on their audience to pursue that justice. In particular, the course will consider the ways that narrative frames justice and the place of the hero and the anti-hero in advancing and bringing about justice.

Ethical Foundations of the Just Society
FY45 PHI 102, MW 3:05pm-4:20pm
Registration code: 2197
Professor Justine Borer

Ethics is the discipline that asks the questions: “what is goodness?” “what is the right thing to do?” and “how do we know it is right?” The course looks at some of the most influential theories of rightness and goodness, and then applies these theories to questions of relevance to the creation and maintenance of a modern, just society, such as: How do we educate people to be good? Is goodness something all humans hold in common, or is it merely the name we give to whatever cultures, groups, societies or individuals judge to be good? Has there been moral progress? And have theories of goodness been properly inclusive of or fair to those who don’t have access to the power to distribute their ideas?

Memory: Imperfections, Injustices and Improvements
FY47 PSY 141, MW 5:55pm-7:10pm
Registration code: 1858
Professor Patricia Sanchez

How reliable are peoples’ memories? We will investigate this question both from a personal point of view, and also within the context of the criminal justice system. You will participate in hands-on learning exercises that are designed to demonstrate the limitations of our memories. You will explore some of the techniques that “memory masters” use to help them to remember enormous amount of information. You will have opportunities to assess whether these techniques help you to remember information in your college classes or everyday lives. You will also learn about the injustices that have occurred when eyewitnesses have made memory errors in identifying the perpetrator of a crime. You will find out about the research that helps us to better understand why and when these types of errors occur, and what can be done to prevent these problems in the future.

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PSYCHOLOGY AND HUMAN SERVICES
great for students with an initial interest in psychology, social work, mental health and wellness

Justice, the Individual, and Struggle in the African American Experience
FY03 AFR 123, TTH 3:05pm-4:20pm
Registration code: 2563
Professor Ernest Lee
FY01 AFR 123, TTH 3:05pm-4:20pm 
Registration code: 2976 
Professor Linda Humes

This course provides first year students with an overview of the African American struggle for freedom, justice and equal opportunity from colonial times to the present. By exploring the African origins of African American and the legacies of slavery, reconstruction, Jim Crow, migration/ black urbanization, and the Civil Rights/Black Power movements the course connects ideas of personal freedom and justice to the lives of today’s students. While studying these issues, students will also develop key skills, including critical inquiry, effective writing, communication, peer collaboration, and planning and goal setting.

The Ethnography of Youth and Justice in New York City
FY08 ANT 100, MW 9:25am-10:40am 
Registration code: 3006 
Professor Merrit Corrigan
FY07 ANT 100, MW 12:15pm-1:30pm
Registration code: 3007 
Professor Merrit Corrigan

This First Year Seminar will examine the tensions around justice that exist between young people in New York City and the wider society in which they live. We will ask questions such as: What does it mean to grow up in a world with changing freedoms, restrictions, opportunities and expectations? How do young people try to achieve justice for themselves and others when the rules and the outcomes sometimes seem unfair? We will explore the dynamic of justice and freedom through topics such as sexuality, labor, violence and drugs. In this class you will learn in theory and use in practice the skills that it takes to be a researcher, skills that will be useful for your school years and in your future professional career.

Justice Issues in the New Millennium
FY41 LLS 100, MW 8:00am-9:15am
Registration code: 3284
Professor Maria Dorta

The new Millennium presents a legacy of long fought struggles, as well as some that are unique to new generations, for equal rights and empowerment of different communities and groups in the United States. Our class will discuss the portrayal of people of color in the media, the challenges to binary understandings of gender identity, the role of gangs as sub-cultural groups and many other topics that raise questions about justice. Through fieldwork, guest speakers, group assignments and the creation of e-portfolios, we will create a safe and positive space for dialogue and debate about the justice issues most pressing for our time.

Memory: Imperfections, Injustices and Improvements
FY48 PSY 141, TTH 8:00am-9:15am
Registration code: 1866
Professor Elena Himmelstein

How reliable are peoples’ memories? We will investigate this question both from a personal point of view, and also within the context of the criminal justice system. You will participate in hands-on learning exercises that are designed to demonstrate the limitations of our memories. You will explore some of the techniques that “memory masters” use to help them to remember enormous amount of information. You will have opportunities to assess whether these techniques help you to remember information in your college classes or everyday lives. You will also learn about the injustices that have occurred when eyewitnesses have made memory errors in identifying the perpetrator of a crime. You will find out about the research that helps us to better understand why and when these types of errors occur, and what can be done to prevent these problems in the future.

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SOCIAL ENTREPENEURSHIP
great for students with an initial interest in innovative solutions for social change and non-profit work

Crime, Class, Capitalism: The Economics of Justice
FY16 ECO 170, MW 9:25am-10:40am
Registration code: 3132
Professor Ludy Thenor

This First Year Seminar examines the connections between capitalism and the criminal justice system in the United States. It investigates the relationships among economic injustice, poverty, wealth, anti-social behavior, crime and the criminal justice system. The course studies how the criminal justice system shapes the lives of individuals from a variety of socioeconomic classes.

Gender, Justice and Social Change
FY88 GEN 140, TTH 12:15pm-1:30pm
Registration code: 1492 
Professor TBA

What exactly is intersectionality--what does it mean and why is it important? In this course we will explore the relationships between activism and women/femme of color feminist perspectives. We will critically examine black feminist perspectives, latina/latinx perspectives, and indigenous women’s theoretical perspectives on gender as a way of understanding how lived experiences and advocacy feed into one’s activist identity. Using some artifacts of popular culture (e.g. media) we will also review and critique the ways in which social change, gender, and activism are represented. What impact does this representation have on broader conceptions of social change? Does representation limit or expand what change is possible? Students will be expected to apply theoretical and popular culture knowledge(s) to a question or observation they find meaningful.

Justice by the Book
FY35 LIT 138, TH 3:05am-4:20am (hybrid)
Registration Code: 3276
Professor Bettina Carbonell
FY36 LIT 138, TH 9:25am-10:40am (hybrid)
Registration Code: 3275
Professor Bettina Carbonell

This semester we will be reading The Round House, a novel by Native American writer Louise Erdrich. Although this is a work of fiction it is deeply rooted in the realities of everyday life and the complexities and limitations of the law. The author weaves her knowledge of cultural heritage rights, tribal history, and legal proceedings into the investigation of a crime that threatens to shatter a family. The reader is asked to inhabit a world where “the right thing to do” is not clear and where those who are responsible for achieving justice seem unable to exercise their authority. Our additional readings will include selections from relevant historical and legal documents as well as critical studies of the novel as a call for social and legal activism.

Tabloid Justice: Causes and Consequences of Crime Sensationalism
FY52 SOC 104, M 3:05pm-5:45pm
Registration code: 61590
Professor David Green

This First Year Seminar will introduce students to the ways in which sensationalized media coverage of crime shapes their own perceptions and understandings of crime problems and what should be done about them. It will provide them with conceptual tools, particularly from the social constructionist perspective, to think critically about how crime is often covered by the media, and how to make sense of what they encounter every day as media consumers.

Historical Perspectives on Justice and Inequality
FY21 HIS 106, TTH 3:05pm-4:20pm
Registration code: 3285
Professor Elizabeth Hovey

Most U.S. citizens believe that the Constitution and its amendments, especially the Bill of Rights, serve to protect them from true injustice.  Surprisingly, that is true today exclusively because many people challenged the ways that the Constitution originally supported inequality.   Join with us to master the history of how the meaning, words and context of the United States' founding document held back what we now consider justice.  Trace the ways in which people organized to change the nation.  The story isn't over, but understanding its 19th and early 20th Century chapters is the first step to finding our nation's proper future.

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SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATH (STEM)
reserved for students in STEM majors: Forensic Science, Cell and Molecular Biology, Toxicology, Computer Science, and Applied Math

Crime, Class, Capitalism: The Economics of Justice
Open to Forensic Science, Cell and Molecular Biology, Toxicology, Computer Science, and Applied Math majors only
FY17 ECO 170, MW 12:15pm-1:30pm
Registration code: 3133
Professor TBA

This First Year Seminar examines the connections between capitalism and the criminal justice system in the United States. It investigates the relationships among economic injustice, poverty, wealth, anti-social behavior, crime and the criminal justice system. The course studies how the criminal justice system shapes the lives of individuals from a variety of socioeconomic classes.

Gender, Justice and Social Change
Open to Forensic Science, Cell and Molecular Biology, Toxicology, Computer Science, and Applied Math majors only
FY19 GEN 140, MW 3:05pm-4:20pm
Registration code: 3269
Professor Bridget Woods

How do ideas about gender affect our daily decisions and interactions? How does gender affect the way college students select majors and specific career fields? How does gender affect power and leadership roles? This course will explore how different forms of media reproduce gender concepts into our consciousness and its real-world implications. Students will understand how to advocate and promote equity, justice and inclusivity to enhance the campus learning community and their own academic and career experience.

Memory: Imperfections, Injustices and Improvements
Reserved for Computer Science majors only
FY49 PSY 141, TTH 3:05pm-4:20pm
Registration code: 24358
Professor Nancy Yang

How reliable are peoples’ memories? We will investigate this question both from a personal point of view and within the context of the criminal justice system. You will participate in hands-on learning exercises that are designed to demonstrate the limitations of our memories. You will explore some of the techniques that “memory masters” use to help them to remember enormous amount of information. You will have opportunities to assess whether these techniques help you to remember information in your college classes or everyday lives. You will also learn about the injustices that have occurred when eyewitnesses have made memory errors in identifying the perpetrator of a crime. You will find out about the research that helps us to better understand why and when these types of errors occur, and what can be done to prevent these problems in the future.

Ethical Foundations of the Just Society
Reserved for Early Start STEM students
FY64 PHI 102, MW 12:15pm-1:30pm
Registration code: 61695
Professor Sergio Gallegos Ordorica

Ethics is the discipline that asks the questions: “what is goodness?” “what is the right thing to do?” and “how do we know it is right?” The course looks at some of the most influential theories of rightness and goodness, and then applies these theories to questions of relevance to the creation and maintenance of a modern, just society, such as: How do we educate people to be good? Is goodness something all humans hold in common, or is it merely the name we give to whatever cultures, groups, societies or individuals we judge to be good? Has there been moral progress? And have theories of goodness been properly inclusive of or fair to those who don’t have access to the power to distribute their ideas?

Case Studies in the Sciences
Reserved for Forensic Science, Cell and Molecular Biology, and Toxicology majors only
FY50 SCI 100, TTH 3:05pm-4:20pm
Registration code: 3716
Professor TBA
FY51 SCI 100, TTH 4:30pm-5:45pm
Registration code: 3717
Professor TBA

This course examines case studies in the sciences and how to use case studies to understand real-world problems. By examining the real-world cases in the natural sciences, you will become familiar with both the discipline of the natural sciences as well as policy, cultural, ethical, and professional considerations. An emphasis will be on Team Work and Learning, a special method of collaborative learning, which does not incorporate lectures and encourages students to learn from their peers and more independently. Case studies tell important stories about real-life controversy and allow students to role-play events that they may be faced with in a professional setting. The cases will focus on three disciplines - cell and molecular biology, toxicology, and criminalistics.

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TEACHING AND EDUCATION
great for students with an initial interest in teaching and educating, equity issues and educational attainment 

Gender, Justice and Social Change
FY20 GEN 140, MW 10:50am-12:05pm
Registration code: 3026
Professor Olivera Jokic

How do ideas about gender affect our daily decisions and interactions? How does gender affect the way college students select majors and specific career fields? How does gender affect power and leadership roles? This course will explore how different forms of media reproduce gender concepts into our consciousness and its real-world implications. Students will understand how to advocate and promote equity, justice and inclusivity to enhance the campus learning community and their own academic and career experience.

Sexual identity and Sociology: LGBT 
FY53 SOC 106, TTH 10:50am-12:05pm
Registration code: 24262
Professor Antonio Jay Pastrana

In this course, we will analyze real-life moments of activism and the role of activist efforts in shaping and reshaping cultural norms and social policies related to gender. This course will help you develop the tools to think critically about – and interpret your own observations and experiences of – gender. In particular, we will explore how individual instances of discrimination can shape one’s life and expand one’s capacity to see beyond the immediate environment. For example, as a sociologist, I view the world through an analytic lens that focuses on issues of race, ethnicity, and sexuality. In particular, my research investigates the experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans (LGBT) people of color – those who do not identify as “White.” It is through this lens that I’ve come to understand some of the basic social forces that every sociologist examines: Family, Government, Education, Religion, Media, and Health, among many others. How activism intersects with gender justice is what will drive our work throughout the semester. Along the way, you will encounter both personal stories as well as academic methods of inquiry that will help you to make sense of your journey at John Jay College and beyond.

Historical Perspectives on Justice and Inequality
FY22 HIS 106, , MW 9:25am-10:40am
Registration code: 2436
Professor Edward Paulino
FY23 HIS 106, MW 10:50am-12:05pm
Registration code: 2437
Professor Edward Paulino
FY24 HIS 106, MW 12:15pm-1:30pm
Registration code: 3140
Professor Edward Paulino

This course explores the history of justice and inequality through examination of select questions and themes. Each section will focus on a different topic or case study from global history, including, for example, disparities of wealth between western and non-western countries, justice and identity in Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the eighteenth century, and a comparative study of the status of minorities in Asian countries.

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FYS Choice Sheets
Use these choice sheets at your Advisement & Registration Seesion under the guidance of an advisor.
All Majors except STEM
STEM Majors
First Year Seminars w/o ENG link

First Year Seminars - August 2020
Early Start First Year Seminars

Summer Bridge Letter to Students