Past Events

Past Events

2015

November 20, 2015
International Crime &Justice MA Students in Action at the ASC Conference in Washington DC!

IC&J student Heather JonesOn November 20, 2015, four of our IC&J MA students presented their research projects on gender and criminal justice at the prestigious conference organized by the American Society of Criminology!

Professors Rosemary Barberet and Susan Kang organized this thematic session entitled Gender and Accountability in Criminal Justice in Transitional and Post-Conflict Countries: Diplomacy Lab Projects. The session featured the research results obtained by MA in International Crime and Justice students during their participation in the U.S. Department of State's Diplomacy Lab Project for the 2014-2015 academic year. Our students conducted research on best practices in post conflict and post transitional countries in the recruitment, retention, and promotion of women in criminal justice.  They also examined law enforcement accountability.

Our IC&J student Heather Jones, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, presenting on “Women in the Judiciary of Lebanon and Morocco: Barriers and Best Practices”    

IC&J student Heather JonesHeather’s presentation examined the recruitment, retention, and promotion of women in the judiciary of Lebanon and Morocco, identifying recent local and donor-led best practices and elucidating cultural and social barriers to the incorporation of women into these professions. In Lebanon, as of 2010, women accounted for 186 out of 551 judges serving in the judiciary -- which is around 34%. Because the inclusion of women in the judiciary is so new, very few efforts have been made to further recruit or to retain them. However, recent American Bar Association (ABA) initiatives in Lebanon have aimed to train female lawyers and increase their rights within the court system. In contrast, Morocco became the first Arab country to allow a woman to serve in the judiciary in 1961. Morocco is also noted for having the largest number of women in their judiciary. Still, female judges are often met with male protests and conservative claims that women should never serve in a position higher than a man, that they should be paid lower wages, and that they should not excel in their work to the point of fame. Conservative men also challenge female judges in the context of Sharia Law by naming “masculinity” as one of the 13 conditions expected to be met by a judge. Heather concluded her presentation with a series of recommendations for increasing the number of women in legal professions in Lebanon and Morocco.

IC&J student Jonathan SimmonsOur IC&J student Jonathan Simmons, John Jay College of Criminal Justice presented on “The Recruitment and Retention of Women in the Afghan Criminal Justice System.”

Jonathan graduated in 2015 and now works for the NY District Attorney’s Office as a Cybercrime and Identity Theft Investigative Analyst!

According to Jonathan’s research, recent data have illustrated that Afghanistan has struggled to recruit women for criminal justice roles in policing and in the courts. As of 2014, women accounted for only 2% of the total Afghan National Police, and as recently as 2008 there was only a total of 165 females employed as judges or lawyers within the state. As a result, women in rural areas may never encounter a single female criminal justice professional in their lifetimes as most police women, female justices, and lawyers reside in the larger metropolitan areas such as Kabul. Women face considerable pressure from both men and women in the state not to be employed in the criminal justice system, as female participation is seen as immoral and against religious and cultural values. More recently, since the end of the Taliban regime in 2001, there has been an effort to  integrate more women into the criminal justice system in response to pressure  mounted by the international community. Finding a way to recruit more women into the criminal justice system is critical in Afghanistan because there is   a need to move away from notions of female inferiority to men and pressure to comply with international law. 

IC&J MA student Ran Hu
IC&J MA student Ran Hu, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, presents on “Law Enforcement Accountability in Colombia.” 

Former IC&J MA student Vincia Merritt-Rogers
Former IC&J MA student Vincia Merritt-Rogers presenting on gender and criminal justice in the Eastern Caribbean region. 

Discussant Debra Perlin, former Justice Advisor at U.S. Department of State, gives feedback to students.
Discussant Debra Perlin, former Justice Advisor at U.S. Department of State, gives feedback to students.


November 16, 2015
International Crime & Justice MA Program Muster Event!

Named “Muster” by Professor Lovely (muster: the assembling or gathering of troops!)

Each year, the International Crime and Justice Program hosts an evening “Muster” event at which students and faculty get together to socialize and network informally. We also invite one or more guest speakers, and food and light refreshments are provided for all to enjoy.

On November 16, 2015, we held our Muster event on the scenic Merrante Terrace. We aimed to answer the age-old question: “What can I do with my degree after I graduate?” Recent alumni shared their valuable experience and told us about the multi-faceted and prestigious positions that our students find after graduating from our program. Three of our alumni spoke about their academic experience at John Jay and described the steps they took to ensure a successful transition into the workplace.

Our alumni hold a wide variety of professional positions, and they continue to share the common goal of serving international criminal justice. 

Jana Arsovska
Dr. Jana Arsovska’s opening remarks during Muster event 

Malgorzata Sekowska
Malgorzata Sekowska, IC&J Alumna Bureau of Refugee and Immigrant Assistance within the Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance

Jonathan Simmons
Jonathan Simmons, IC&J Alumnus and former program assistant/peer advisor; Investigative Analyst for the New York District Attorney’s Office on Cybercrime and Identity Theft

Michael Temple
Michael Temple, IC&J Alumnus and former Development Director at John Jay Center for Private Security and Safety;  Financial Crime Compliance Quality Assurance Manager, Standard Chartered Bank


October - November, 2015 
International Crime &Justice MA Students Attending Expert Workshop on Preparing Investigation Reports!

The International Crime and Justice Master of Arts Program at John Jay College presented a series of hands-on workshops during the fall 2015 semester.   The most popular choice in the series was Preparing Investigative Reports (how to draft search and arrest warrants, complaints and investigative reports).

Here is our description of the workshop:

Preparing Investigative Reports and Analysis:
 This workshop will provide graduate students with the skills required to prepare, analyze, write, and disseminate investigative reports. Workshop materials are designed for both students planning to enter the public sector and students planning to enter the private sector or corporate realm.   For students planning  careers in criminal justice as either a field operative or a research analyst, topics of interest include how to prepare effective field notes; reports of investigation; criminal complaints; search and arrest warrants; subpoenas; and intelligence briefs. Topics of interest to students planning careers in the private sector include how to prepare a risk management/threat assessment. In addition, our presenter Dr. Gus Xhudo will speak about his experience developing risk assessment strategies and prosecuting cases while serving as as the Regional Security Officer-US Embassy-Lisbon, Portugal. 

Dr. Gus Xhudo
Dr. Gus Xhudo presenting at John Jay College

Gus Xhudo received his Ph.D. from the University of St. Andrews, Center for Terrorism and Political Violence, Scotland, UK, in 1995. He has served as a private consultant for several think tanks in Washington, including SAIC, The Scowcroft Group, and Brookings as well as for law enforcement agencies in the NY-NJ area. He has been a regular contributor to journals such as Jane’s Intelligence Review; Studies in Conflict and Terrorism; and NJ COPS Magazine. Dr. Xhudo began his career in 1997 as an intelligence analyst with State before becoming a Special Agent in 1999 with the Diplomatic Security Service. He served as the Anti-Fraud Coordinator at the U.S. Consulate in Lagos Nigeria before being assigned in 2002 to the New York Joint Terrorist Task Force. He has trained a variety of local, state, federal, and foreign law enforcement personnel, including the New York State Police; CT State Police; NJ-NY Marshals Fugitive Task Force; NYPD Intel; NYPD Recruitment; MAGLOCLEN; CA Bureau of Investigation; U.S. Secret Service; FBI; Dutch Border Police; British Immigration and Customs; The Irish Garda;  and Bergen County Police Academy. After serving as a Unit Supervisor for the DSS New York Field Office for the Tri-State JTTF agents, he was relocated to Portugal in 2008 to become the Regional Security Officer, U.S. Embassy-Lisbon. More recently, after serving on the Joint Terrorism Task Force in Newark he transferred to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security-New York in 2011.  He has been an adjunct instructor for Fairleigh Dickinson University’s graduate program in Homeland Security Studies since 2008 and Director of Mercy College’s undergraduate program in Corporate and Homeland Security, NY, since 2013. He is presently detailed from the Department of Homeland Security Investigations on special assignment to the NYPD-Intelligence Bureau, Terrorist Interdiction Unit. Dr. Xhudo has received commendations from the Director of U.S. National Intelligence, the Director of the FBI, and the Director of the U.S. Secret Service for his work in national security-related cases.

This is what the students had to say:

Over three consecutive Tuesday evenings, Dr. Gus Xhudo led a workshop series at John Jay College of Criminal Justice for graduate students.  The series covered practical investigative techniques. Given Dr. Xhudo’s extensive international experience working as an intelligence analyst and as Special Agent with the Diplomatic Security Service, the New York Joint Terrorist Task Force,  and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security-New York, he was able to impart great insight to workshop attendees. The workshop was developed specifically for future investigators, analysts and criminal justice professionals. We received very valuable information covering all aspects of investigation: how to prepare and write successful investigative reports and field notes; how to properly interview suspects and witnesses; and how to execute search warrants. Dr. Xhudo demonstrated relevant techniques throughout the workshop by continuously featuring real-life cases he had worked on during his career. The last workshop was dedicated to putting our newly acquired knowledge to the test. Each group was given a distinct role to play in solving a real-life case. We created an investigation plan from an analyst’s as well as an investigator’s perspective and executed an affidavit. With great humor and knowledge, Dr. Xhudo helped everyone participate in the workshop exercises. The workshop was truly  informative, exciting, and fun, and it gave us very valuable tools that we will put to use in our future professional endeavors in the field of criminal justice.  Sara Cronqvist, IC&J MA student from Sweden 

IC&J students attending the investigative workshop. Fourteen completed the three-day workshop and received their certificates of attendance. Congratulations!

The report writing workshop by Professor Gus Xhudo exceeded all expectations. Professor Xhudo’s outgoing character made him a very engaging lecturer. He was able to draw the attention of the workshop participants to key areas of his lessons by relating relevant aspects of his personal experience as an investigator and analyst. Additionally, he was able to encourage active participation from the entire group by creating an atmosphere that was open and professional. Professor Xhudo used a criminal investigation analyst’s approach to report writing. The workshop began with an exercise in understanding information and its sources  and evaluating the situation in order to determine possible leads for more information. Newly completed investigation cases were used as examples. The exercises often led to conversation and discussions outside of the classroom amongst classmates. Because the lessons generated outside conversations, the workshop can be credited with encouraging innovative methods of increasing knowledge retention as well as fostering an eagerness for more knowledge in the field of intelligence analysis. The workshop concluded with a group exercise in applying the taught methodologies.  Professor Xhudo’s workshop led the class to discover – rather than taught the class – how to become better report writers by developing an awareness of the multi-facetted dynamics of gathering information and intelligence; developing strategies for managing that information; and learning how to present that information for effective law enforcement purposes. As a law enforcement officer studying at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, I felt privileged to be able to learn from the experience of one such as Professor Gus Xhudo. If you have not attended a workshop or lecture by Professor Xhudo, make time, sign up, and prepare to be marveled. Kartika Rahman, IC&J MA student from Brunei 

The report writing workshop by Professor Gus Xhudo exceeded all expectations. Professor Xhudo’s outgoing character made him a very engaging lecturer. He was able to draw the attention of the workshop participants to key areas of his lessons by relating relevant aspects of his personal experience as an investigator and analyst. Additionally, he was able to encourage active participation from the entire group by creating an atmosphere that was open and professional. Professor Xhudo used a criminal investigation analyst’s approach to report writing. The workshop began with an exercise in understanding information and its sources  and evaluating the situation in order to determine possible leads for more information. Newly completed investigation cases were used as examples. The exercises often led to conversation and discussions outside of the classroom amongst classmates. Because the lessons generated outside conversations, the workshop can be credited with encouraging innovative methods of increasing knowledge retention as well as fostering an eagerness for more knowledge in the field of intelligence analysis. The workshop concluded with a group exercise in applying the taught methodologies.  Professor Xhudo’s workshop led the class to discover – rather than taught the class – how to become better report writers by developing an awareness of the multi-facetted dynamics of gathering information and intelligence; developing strategies for managing that information; and learning how to present that information for effective law enforcement purposes. As a law enforcement officer studying at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, I felt privileged to be able to learn from the experience of one such as Professor Gus Xhudo. If you have not attended a workshop or lecture by Professor Xhudo, make time, sign up, and prepare to be marveled. Kartika Rahman, IC&J MA student from Brunei 


Guest Lectures –  International Crime &Justice – Fall 2015!

Dwight Smith Guest Lecture -- A Spectrum of Enterprise -- October 5, 2015
By Geris Duma, IC&J MA student 

On October 5, 2015 Mr. Dwight Smith delivered a lecture entitled A Spectrum of Enterprise, which gave us a preview of his upcoming book entitled The Spectrum of Enterprise: Where Business and Crime Intersect. Mr. Smith is one of the founding faculty members of John Jay College and also one of the first scholars to study and publish on organized crime as an illicit enterprise. Between 1967 and 1972, Mr. Smith taught one of John Jay’s first seminars on organized crime. In 1972, he wrote The Mafia Mystique, a highly-regarded book on the development of the imagery linked to the term “mafia.” He has served as an associate professor at Rutgers University and as the Director of Institutional Research at State University of New York at Albany.  Mr. Smith continued management work in New York State government until his retirement in 1993. In 2014, the International Association named him a Distinguished Scholar for the Study of Organized Crime. 

Mr. Dwight Smith with Dr. Jana Arsovska
Mr. Dwight Smith with Dr. Jana Arsovska, Director of the International Crime & Justice MA Program.

John Jay College students and faculty during Dwight Smith’s guest lecture
John Jay College students and faculty during Dwight Smith’s guest lecture 

Dr. Jana Arsovska and Mr. Dwight Smith
Director of the Program Dr. Jana Arsovska introducing Mr. Dwight Smith and the topic of the lecture  


Jonneke Koomen Guest Lecture -- Survivors’ Testimonies at International Criminal Tribunals -- October 16, 2015  
By Itena Dhrami, IC&J MA student

Professor Jonneke Koomen, an associate professor at Willamette University teaching in the Department of Politics and in the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, delivered a lecture on the testimony given by survivors before international criminal tribunals. Professor Koomen has worked extensively on projects involving war cases before the International Criminal Court and the ad hoc International Criminal Tribunals for Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia. Her focus on the often invisible team of court interpreters, language assistants, and social workers sheds light on the difficulties and the emotionally complexities of  helping war crimes victims. 


Dr. Jonneke Koomen, Ph.D., Associate Professor at Willamette University in Oregon

Professor Koomen argues that -- more often than not -- it is the work of these court personnel that makes possible the archiving and presention of material that ultimately persuades the international arena and the International Court to hold war criminals accountable for their actions. By breaking language barriers and bridging geographic and social divides, these court personnel allow testimonies to be collected, thus increasing the chance that violence will be reported and that the voices of victims will be represented in the quest for justice. It would not be an overstatement to say that the work of these court personnel is critical in solving the humanitarian crises that unfortunately have been a prominent part of our history.  

IC&J MA students and faculty attending Professor Koomen’s lecture
IC&J MA students and faculty attending Professor Koomen’s lecture 

Not only does Professor Koomen’s work bring attention to the underappreciated work of these court personnel, her work also provides an inside look at international organizations and how they are involved in humanitarian crises. More specifically, her work presents numerous accounts of how personnel of international organizations have made it possible for genocide victims to come forward with their testimonies. Professor Koomen told us what she learned when she conducted her interviews of court personnel.   One of the Rwandan interpreters collecting testimonies for the ad hoc International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) reported that while she was attempting to collect war crime testimonies, the victim would often say: “You people abandoned us….and now you come back to ask questions.” This sentence alone is evidence of the direct emotional involvement of the court workers with victims of war crimes. On many occasions, these workers are at the forefront of encountering the pain, distrust, reluctance and anger that is the result of prolonged abuse and violation of  human rights on a daily basis.  

IC&J MA students and faculty attending Professor Koomen’s lecture
IC&J MA students and faculty attending Professor Koomen’s lecture

Professor Koomen also described the dilemmas that arise when bridging linguistic divides between tribunal representatives and victims and witnesses of mass atrocity. According to Professor Koomen, the process of conducting international investigations should be further analyzed and modified so that the process can be less traumatic for the victims while still eliciting a true reflection of the magnitude of the atrocities. Professor Koomen drew her conclusions after analyzing the results of thirty-two interviews with ICTR prosecutors, investigators, administrators, and language workers and twelve interviews with ICC employees.

This lecture was particularly important to International Crime and Justice students because it encouraged an understanding that the long road to achieving justice is a multifaceted process. Every aspect of the legal system and of victimology must be carefully analyzed and scrutinized.  We must be able to understand and challenge institutions so that we can improve them . It is our responsibility to do just that. Especially when facing the challenge of understanding crime in the international arena where cultural differences add layers of complexity, we must be able to recognize nuanced differences in order to be effective advocates of international justice. 

Itena was born in Tirana, Albania, but for several years has been calling New York City home. “I graduated from Columbia University in Neuroscience/Psychology and received my first Masters in Forensic Psychology from John Jay College of Criminal Justice at City University of New York. During my first Masters, my focus was in studying Victimology.  My studies culminated with my thesis, entitled “Victimology: Analysis of Behavioral Consistency and Inconsistency in Serial Homicide Case,” which I  conducted as a project in collaboration with the Investigative Psychology Research Unit and FBI Behavioral Science Unit. Currently, I am pursuing a Masters in International Crime and Justice at the same institution. My focus remains on studying victimology from an international perspective, and more specifically my future plans involve pursuing investigative analysis related to victimology in transnational crime.


 

Anna Sergi Guest Lecture – The Internationalization of the Calabrian ‘Ndrangheta -- November 16, 2015 


Dr. Anna Sergi, LL.M & Ph.D. 

On Monday, November 16, 2015, Dr. Anna Sergi delivered a guest lecture entitled The Internationalization of the Calabrian ‘Ndrangheta: Blood Ties, Drugs and the Political Nexus of the Most Powerful Italian Mafia. 

Dr. Anna Sergi holds a Ph.D. in Sociology (2014) with specialization in Criminology from the Department of Sociology at the University of Essex, UK. Her research focuses on organized crime and comparative criminal justice. Dr. Sergi is a lecturer in Policing and Crime Sciences at the University of Essex and the University of West London in. In 2014, she served as a research assistant for the RCUK Global Uncertainties Program at the University of Cambridge. Dr. Sergi is also a co-chair of the post-graduate committee of the British Society of Criminology and a newsletter editor for the Executive Committee of the ECPH Standing Group on Organized Crime.