Math, Science, and Technology

Math, Science, and Technology

Math, Science, and Technology Majors

Math, science, and technology provide invaluable contributions to the functioning of our modern world, and are often inter-related. They are the foundation for many professions such as medicine, engineering, accounting, pharmacy, education, and play a huge role in the daily functioning and success of most businesses and organizations. They are often the behind-the-scenes expertise that leads to advances in all kinds of research, prompting the creation of more advanced tools, systems, practices, and technology that move both our understanding and our knowledge of what is possible forward. 

Applied Mathematics
The Applied Mathematics major has two concentrations, Data Science and Cryptography. The Data Science concentration presents the principles of data representation, big data management, and statistical modeling. Students learn to use modern computing techniques to reveal hidden causal and temporal relationships within large data sets. Hidden information is often benign but it might also be evidence of malevolent activities that have already occurred or are in progress. Cryptography is the science of both personal and institutional data security. Students learn to secure information, maintain data integrity, authenticity, and non-reputability. Cryptologists play a vital role in detecting events yet to unfold, especially when attempting to interdict and thwart incipient cyber intrusions and terrorist attacks.

The curriculum offers an integrated academic program with the depth and breadth necessary to make graduates truly competitive in the job market. Both concentrations provide the knowledge and the skills that are in demand in high tech entrepreneurship, finance, modern communications, medicine, security, transportation, and manufacturing. The New York City metropolitan region is being repositioned as a nexus of technological innovation and discovery as well as a haven for entrepreneurial leadership. Such a metamorphosis requires the availability of a renewable work force possessing skills in data analysis and data security. Consequently, employment opportunities are expected to be available for applied mathematics graduates for the foreseeable future.

In the Applied Mathematics major you will:
  • Apply the principles of mathematical proof and deductive logic to prove level appropriate mathematical statements or create counterexamples with the context of the real number axioms and the axioms defining various algebraic structures.
  • Apply the mathematical modeling process to modern problems in data science and cryptography for the purpose of analyzing large data sets and encrypting plain text or decrypting cipher text.
  • Function effectively in an interdisciplinary team environment and express quantitative information effectively to others.
  • Identify and adhere to the ethical constraints of respecting personal data privacy and evaluate and assess ethical standards for the application of cryptographic algorithms in contemporary contexts. 

 

Cell and Molecular Biology
The Cell and Molecular Biology major is an in-depth exploration of the underlying chemistry and molecular biology in living cells. The cell is the basic unit of living things and so it is impossible to understand life without understanding cells. The major begins with the foundational science courses common to any degree in the chemical or life sciences: chemistry, biology, organic chemistry, calculus, and physics, with required laboratory work throughout. Then, students take a required core of more advanced courses: cell biology, genetics, biochemistry, and molecular biology. While completing the biology core, students select five elective courses that suit their interests and future career goals such as microbiology, human physiology, forensic anthropology, and the list continues to grow each year. Finally, the major includes an advanced capstone experience which brings all of these courses together in the study of a specific research area in the biomedical sciences. Students in this major are well-prepared for a variety of careers and graduate programs including PhD programs in the life sciences, medical school, and related professional degrees.

In the Cell and Molecular Biology major you will:
  • Understand the mathematical, chemical, and physical components of living systems
  • Describe the basic cellular and molecular processes that underlie living organisms
  • Engage the scientific methodology, experimentation, and theory unique to cellular and molecular biology
  • Communicate scientific knowledge, experimentation, and ideas effectively in oral and written forms
  • Demonstrate advanced and thorough knowledge of at least one specialized sub-discipline of Biology

 

Computer Science and Information Security
The Computer Science and Information Security major offers the computing, quantitative and analytical expertise public and private organizations need to advance the practice of digital forensics and cybersecurity. The program provides the broad background in computing that is needed to thwart the abuse and misuse of computers, data networks, information systems and information infrastructures, in the environment of ever advancing digital technology. The courses in the Computer Science and Information Security major prepare students for direct entry into the profession as well as entry into graduate and professional programs that rely on computing and quantitative methods, especially in areas related to digital forensics and cybersecurity.

In the Computer Science and Information Security major you will:
  • Use and critically evaluate the variety of theoretical approaches that are relevant to Computer Science and Information Security.
  • Use and critically evaluate the variety of practical/hands-on/research approaches that are relevant to Computer Science and Information Security.
  • Analyze the quality of the programs in Computer Science and Information Security.
  • Communicate effectively through integrating theory, research and policy in written reports and presentations.
  • Understand the ethical considerations and statutory requirements computer professionals encounter as care takers of sensitive data and designers and developers of systems that can impact the well-being of individuals and organizations.

 

Fire Science 
The Fire Science major concentrates on the analysis of fire vulnerabilities to reduce losses of life and property in both the public and private sectors.  The program prepares students for careers as fire safety specialists, managers, consultants and entrepreneurs.  

In the Fire Science major you will:
  • Identify and categorize the core mechanisms of fire growth and suppression
  • Appraise and evaluate the built environment and its relationship to fire growth and suppression
  • Develop and critique fire protection designs
  • Organize and disseminate the policy and processes of fire safety and fire protection

 

Forensic Science
The Forensic Science  major is designed to provide academic and professional training for students seeking to work in forensic science laboratories, or who are planning to pursue careers as research scientists, teachers or medical professionals. The major draws primarily from chemistry (organic, analytical and physical) with courses in biology, physics and law. Students may specialize in one of three tracks: Criminalistics, Molecular Biology, or Toxicology.

In the Forensic Science major you will:
  • Draw appropriate scientific conclusions from evidence and experimental data. 
  • Understand the role of creativity in problem solving. 
  • Apply scientific principles in gathering and interpreting scientific data. 
  • Acquire broad fundamental concepts, theories, and principles in physical and biological sciences. 
  • Use the primary scientific literature effectively in their own research. 
  • Describe the scientific progress that has led to their research project. 
  • Accrue hands-on laboratory and practical research skills, including emphasizing the role of quality assurance and objectivity in scientific data collection and how these relate to the system of professional ethics in science. 
  • Develop competence in oral and written forms of scientific communication. 

 

Toxicology     
The Toxicology major allows you to study an interdisciplinary science that addresses the adverse effects of substances on living organisms caused by chemical, physical or biological agents. The field includes exposure assessment, hazard identification, dose-response analysis, risk characterization and risk management. Toxicologists have the critical responsibility of understanding the effect of exposure to harmful substances found in food, the environment, medicines, licit and illicit drugs and other sources, as well as that of publicizing information of relevance to the public. Through research and education, toxicologists can improve the health and safety of humans and other living organisms and protect the environment in which we live.  

The major begins with the foundational science courses common to any degree in the chemical or life sciences: chemistry, biology, organic chemistry, calculus, and physics, with required laboratory work throughout. Then, students take a required core of courses that cover biochemistry, human physiology, the basics of toxicology and its major sub-fields (environmental, biomedical, clinical). Students also select two elective courses they can focus on their interests and future career goals such as risk assessment, forensic toxicology, genetics, microbiology, and inorganic chemistry. Finally, the major includes an advanced capstone experience which brings all of these courses together in the study of a specific research area in toxicology. Students in this major are well-prepared for a variety of careers and graduate programs including PhD programs in toxicology, the life sciences, medical school, and related professional degrees.

 

In the Toxicology major you will:
  • Describe the distribution and the toxic mechanism of chemical, physical, and biological agents in the natural and occupational environment.
  • Identify and describe the diseases or other adverse health effects that may result from exposure to toxic agents and the risk of those outcomes. 
  • Recognize regulatory and management considerations relative to toxic agents. 
  • Apply quantitative methods to measure the concentration or intensity of toxic agents.
  • Explain and promote interventions to reduce or eliminate exposures to toxic agents.
  • Interpret and analyze the information on the interaction of natural and man-made toxicants with people, and their impact on human health and disease.
  • Assess and communicate risk of toxins affecting communities of varied racial, socioeconomic and geographic divisions.