Temporary Protected Status (TPS) | John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Temporary Protected Status (TPS)

Temporary Protected Status (TPS)

What is TPS? 

According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), TPS stands for Temporary Protected Status. TPS allows a group of people temporary refuge status in the U.S. The Secretary of Homeland Security may designate nationals of a foreign state to be eligible for TPS with a finding that conditions in that country pose a danger to personal safety due to ongoing armed conflict or an environmental disaster. Extraordinary and temporary conditions in the country that prevent the safe return of the population.

TPS Grants initially cover periods of 6 to 18 months, and may be extended depending on the situation. Removal proceedings are suspended against people with Temporary protected Status. TPS beneficiaries will not be required to leave the U.S. and may obtain work authorization for the initial TPS period and for any extensions of the designation. TPS does not lead to permanent resident status. 

Under the Trump administration, the Department of Homeland Security has announced the end of TPS for immigrants from El Salvador, Haiti, Sudan and Nicaragua but extended it for immigrants from South Sudan. And this year, the agency will decide whether to extend TPS for five other nations: Syria, Nepal, Honduras, Yemen and Somalia. 

 

Here are some questions answered by iAmerica Action

What are the requirements to receive TPS?

  • Arrived in the U.S. and continued to live in the U.S. since a specific date
  • Filed an application with a filing fee and passed security and criminal checks

Who are the people who have TPS?

People with TPS are essential workers who have lived and worked in the U.S. for years and even decades. Many people with TPS work in construction, the hotel and restaurant industry, landscaping and childcare. Many also operate their own businesses. About 100,000 TPS holders live in homes that they own and pay mortgages to U.S. banks.

Who are TPS?

Country: Honduras
Population: 57,000
Expiration Date: Nov. 5, 2017
Decision Date: Nov. 6, 2017
Original Designation: Jan. 5, 1999
Redesignations (if any): N/A
Type of Designation: (B) environmental disaster and inability. temporarily, to accept returns

Country: Nicaragua
Population: 2,550
Expiration Date: Nov. 6, 2017
Decision Date: Nov. 6, 2017
Original: Designation: Jan. 5, 1999
Redesignations (if any): N/A
Type of Designation: (B) environmental disaster and inability. temporarily, to accept returns

Country: Haiti
Population: 50,000
Expiration Date: Jan. 22, 2018
Decision Date: Nov. 23, 2017
Original Designation: Jan. 21, 2010
Redesignations (if any): July 23, 2011
Type of Designation: (C) extraordinary and temporary conditions

Country: El Salvador
Population: 195,000
Expiration Date: Mar. 9, 2018
Decision Date: Mar. 9, 2001
Original Designation: N/A
Redesignations (if any): N/A
Type of Designation: (B) environmental disaster and inability. temporarily, to accept returns

Country: Syria
Population: 5,800
Expiration Date: Mar. 31, 2018
Decision Date: Jan. 30, 2001
Original Designation: Mar. 29, 2012
Redesignations (if any): June 17, 2013; January 5, 201; and Aug. 1, 2016
Type of Designation: (A) ongoing armed conflict AND (C) extraordinary and temporary conditions

Country: Nepal
Population: 8,950
Expiration Date: June 24, 2018
Decision Date: Apr. 25, 2018
Original Designation: June 24, 2015
Redesignations (if any): N/A
Type of Designation: (B) earthquake and inability, temporarily, to accept returns

Country: Yemen
Population: 1,000
Expiration Date: Sept. 3, 2018
Decision Date: July 5, 2018
Original Designation: Sept. 3, 2015
Redesignations (if any): Jan. 4, 2017
Type of Designation: (A) ongoing armed conflict AND (C) extraordinary and temporary conditions

Country: Somalia
Population: 270
Expiration Date: Sept. 17, 2018
Decision Date: July 19, 2018
Original Designation: Sept. 16, 1991
Redesignations (if any): Sept. 4, 2001 and Sept. 18, 2012
Type of Designation: (A) ongoing armed conflict AND (C) extraordinary and temporary conditions

Country: Sudan
Population: 450
Expiration Date: Termination effective Nov. 2, 2018
Decision Date: N/A
Original Designation: Nov. 4, 1997
Redesignations (if any): Nov. 9, 1999; Nov. 2, 20014 and May 3, 2013
Type of Designation: (A) ongoing armed conflict AND (C) extraordinary and temporary conditions

Country: South Sudan
Population: 75-200
Expiration Date: May 2, 2019
Decision Date: Mar. 3, 2019
Original Designation: Nov. 3, 2001
Redesignations (if any): Sept. 2, 2014 and Jan. 25, 2016
Type of Designation: (A) ongoing armed conflict AND (C) extraordinary and temporary conditions

 

TPS Update for SALVADORANS

On January 8, 2018, Homeland Security (DHS) announced the termination of Salvadoran TPS (Temporary Protected Status) as of September 9, 2019. More than 200,000 Salvadorans with TPS have lived and worked legally, paid taxes, attended schools and contributed to their communities since at least 2001. Many Salvadorans have U.S. citizen children and other U.S. citizen family members. The fight to pass a law protecting TPS holders

TPS extended through: March 9, 2018
Re-registration period for People Who Already Have TPS: July 8, 2016- Sept. 6, 2016
Employment Authorization Document (EAD) Auto-Extended Through: Sept. 9, 2017
Continuous Residence in U.S. Since: Feb. 13, 2001
Continuous Physical Presence in U.S. Since: March 9, 2001
TPS Designation Date: March 9, 2001
Federal register Notice Citation: 81 FR 44645
81 FR 12629 (EAD extension)

 

iAmerica Action has created a list of important things and dates Salvadorans with TPS should know and do now.

TPS Update for HAITIANS 

On November 20, 2017, Homeland Security (DHS) Acting Secretary Duke announced the termination of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Haitians with an 18-month grace period (until July 22, 2019) and the requirement that Haitians reapply for work permission in order to continue working. The end of this important program means that 59,000 people from Haiti who have lived in the United States legally for years, will lose their permission to live and work here and could face deportation. 

TPS extended through: Jan. 22, 2018
Re-registration period for People Who Already Have TPS: May 24, 2017- July 24, 2017
Employment Authorization Document (EAD) Auto-Extended Through: Jan. 18, 2018, but only for beneficiaries who re-register and request a new EAD
Continuous Residence in U.S. Since: Jan. 12, 2011
Continuous Physical Presence in U.S. Since: July 23, 2011
TPS Designation Date: Jan. 21, 2010
Federal register Notice Citation: 82 FR 23830

 

iAmerica Action has created a list of important things and deadlines Haitians with TPS should know and do now:

 

TPS Update for HONDURANS 

USCIS.gov states that current beneficiaries of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) under Honduras’ designation who want to maintain that status through the current expiration date of July 5, 2018, must re-register between Dec. 15, 2017 and Feb. 13, 2018. Re-registration procedures, including how to renew employment authorization documentation, have been published in the Federal Register and on the USCIS website.

TPS extended through: July 8, 2018
Re-registration period for People Who Already Have TPS: Dec. 15, 2017- Feb. 13, 2017
Employment Authorization Document (EAD) Auto-Extended Through: July 4, 2018
Continuous Residence in U.S. Since: Dec. 30, 1998
Continuous Physical Presence in U.S. Since: Jan. 5, 1999
TPS Designation Date: Jan. 5, 1999
Federal register Notice Citation: 82 FR 59630

 

This is a list of important things Hondurans with TPS should know and do now. 

TPS Update for NICARAGUANS 

According to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, TPS for 5,300 Nicaraguans immigrants will end January 2019. On December 15, 2017, DHS published details about the process of applying for an extension of employment authorization and TPS for Nicaraguan TPS holders.

TPS to Terminate on: Jan. 5, 2019
Re-registration period for People Who Already Have TPS: Dec. 15, 2017- Feb. 13, 2017
Employment Authorization Document (EAD) Auto-Extended Through: March 6, 2018 
Additionally, the EADs of TPS beneficiaries who timely re-register (Form I-821, Application for Temporary Protected Status) and file a rquest for a new EAD (Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization) will be automatically extended through July 4, 2018
Continuous Residence in U.S. Since: Dec. 30, 1998
Continuous Physical Presence in U.S. Since: Jan. 5, 1999
TPS Designation Date: Jan. 5, 1999
Federal register Notice Citation: 82 FR 59636

 

iAmerica Action has created a list of important things Nicaraguans with TPS should know and do now.