Upcoming Courses

Upcoming Courses

 

 

​                                                         Study Abroad
Havana, Cuba:  June 26, 2017 - July 14,2017
LLS 260/HIS 260 History of Contemporary Cuba
Instructor: Professor John A. Gutiérrez

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Fall 2017 LLS courses

LLS 124 Latina/os in the United States
This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the field of Latin American and Latina/o Studies focusing on the establishment and development of the diverse Latina/o communities in the United States through the processes of migration, colonization, racialization, and integration. Students will explore the intersections of race, class, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality through such topics as identity formation, language rights, economic and political participation, transnationalism, law and civil rights and social justice movements.
Note: This course satisfies the Flexible Core: US Experience in its Diversity

LLS 130 Introduction to Latin American History
This is a survey course spanning Latin America’s history from the pre-Columbian period to the recent past.  Focus is on the origins and development of Latin American social, political and economic systems, Amerindian and African peoples, the legacies of colonialism and slavery, the pursuit of nationhood and identity, the persistence of inequality, and the role of the United States in shaping the destiny of the region.

LLS 220 Human Rights and Law in Latin America
A comparative study of human rights policies, procedures, legislation and practices in Latin American countries. The impact of international and national conventions, bills and laws on the present observance of these rights. Inquiry into morality, social justice, social and professional ethics.
This course can be taken to satisfy requirements for the International Criminal Justice major.
Prerequisites: ENG 101, and sophomore standing or above or permission of the section instructor

LLS 242 U.S. Foreign Policy in Latin America
(Same course as GOV 242 and POL 242 and HIS 242)
U.S. economic and political relations with Latin American countries during the 19th and 20th centuries. U.S. reactions to reform and revolutionary movements. The ideological framework of U.S. foreign policy.
Prerequisites: ENG 101, and GOV 101 or POL 101 or permission of the section instructor

LLS 250 Drugs, Crime and Law in Latin America

This course explores the problems facing Latin America in relation to drugs and crime. The course focuses on the conditions giving rise to crime, drug trafficking and drug addiction in Latin America. It offers a basic understanding of international legal and human rights standards and law enforcement efforts that apply in addressing the issues of drugs and crime. Particular emphasis is placed on hemispheric strategies to combat drug use and narcotics trafficking.

This course can be taken to satisfy requirements for the International Criminal Justice major.

Prerequisites: ENG 101, and sophomore standing or above or permission of the section instructor

LLS 322 Latino/a Struggles for Civil Rights and Social Justice
This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of the experiences of Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans and other Latino/as during the Civil Rights period. It focuses on the Latino/a social movements during the 1960s and their consequences today for the struggles for civil rights and social justice of Latino/as and other racial minorities in the U.S. Topics include access to education and employment; immigrant rights; detention and deportation; race and crime; Latino/a and African American alliance building; Latino/a citizenship and the military, and gender values and sexuality.
Prerequisite: ENG 201 and junior standing or above 
Note: This course satisfies the John Jay College Option: Struggle for Justice and Equality in the U.S. (300-level) area of the Gen Ed Program.

LLS 325 The Latina/o Experience of Criminal Justice
This course analyzes the criminal justice system and its impact on the lives and communities of Latino/as and other groups in the United States. Particular emphasis is placed on Latino/as human and civil rights and the role that race, ethnicity, gender and class play in the criminal justice system. Interdisciplinary readings and class discussions center on issues such as the over-representation of Latino/as and racial minorities in the criminal justice system; law and police community relations; racial profiling; stop and frisk policies; immigration status; detentions and deportations; Latino/a youth; media representations; gangs; and access to education and employment and the school-to-prison-pipeline.
Prerequisite: ENG 201 and junior standing or above

Note: This course satisfies the John Jay College Option: Struggle for Justice and Equality in the U.S. (300-level) area of the Gen Ed Program.

LLS 341 Immigrant Rights in the Americas
Gobalization has increased the fear of foreigners, leading to debates on immigrant rights in all parts of the world and raising the question of who gets to belong to a given society. We begin by exploring the reception of foreigners in different nations, including immigrants in the Americas. We then assess the factors that lead Latin Americans to leave their homelands, and examine the ways that immigrants' national origins, race, class, and gender shape and differentiate their experiences in U.S. society. Finally, we focus on the changing relationship between legal status and access to rights in the United States. This course aims to provide students with the conceptual and empirical arguements necessary to assess and debate the issue of immigrant rights in the Americas today.
Prerequisite: ENG 201 and junior standing or above

Note: This course satisfies the John Jay College Option: Justice in Global Perspective (300-level) area of the Gen Ed Program.

LLS 343 Race and Citizenship in the Americas
This course explores the relationship between citizenship and racial ideologies in the Americas. Framed by theoretical analyses of race and ethnicity, the course uses historical essays, biographies, novels and films to examine the lived experience of race and blackness in Latin America and the United States. Focusing on the different meanings attributed to blackness in the Americas, the course ultimately aims to compare the diverse racial, class and gendered experiences of U.S. Latinos with those of ethnic and racialized groups in Latin America.

LLS 356 Terror and Transitional Justice in Latin America 

This course examines explores the field of transitional justice as it addresses past state violence and genocide. The course will move from an exploration of background material examining the Cold War years in Latin America providing an in-depth analysis of the role played by truth commissions, and other strategies such as war tribunals, which seek justice and reconciliation in divided societies. We will question the root causes of violence, examine national and transitional actors, and conculde with a discussion of research methodologies used when documenting human rights abuse. The question of "forgiveness" will be also explored in the context of redress for wrongdoings. 
Prerequisite: ENG 201 and junior standing or permission of the instructor

LLS 363 Il-legal Subjects: U.S. Latina/o Literature and the Law
This course examines how the law shapes contemporary Latina/o life in the United States. Students will examine the relationships between legal texts and literature. Latina/o literature not only responds to the law, but also to its inequitable enforcement. We will read court cases, law reviews, and literary analysis in order to study the way Latina/o literature exposes contradictions in the legal system. Topics covered may include the legal construction of race, the criminalization of youth, law and U.S. colonialism, violence against women, and challenges to individual civil liberties.
Prerequisite: ENG 201 and junior standing or above

Note: This course satisfies the John Jay College Option: Struggle for Justice and Equality in the U.S. (300-level) area of the Gen Ed Program.

LLS 364 Ethical Strains in U.S. Latina/o Literature 
This course will use Latina/o literature to examine the beliefs that instruct individuals’ moral judgments and actions. Through a range of literary texts students will discuss the social and political issues that confront Latina/o communities: the psychological consequences of colonialism; the moral dilemmas surrounding immigration; the epistemological violence of racism and sexism; and the cultural norms that inform or constrain personal conduct. Specific topics will vary based on the instructor’s specialization and will cover a range of theoretical approaches to the study of moral inquiry in Latina/o literature.
Prerequisite: ENG 201 and junior standing or above

Note: This course satisfies the John Jay College Option: Justice in Global Perspective (300-level) area of the Gen Ed Program.