Volume 5

Volume 5

 

 

U.S. EXECUTIVES’ PERCEPTIONS

OF EMERGING NATIONS

AS FDI OPTIONS

Troy A. Festervand, Middle Tennessee State University

Richard T. Mpoyi, Middle Tennessee State University

 

In this study, perceptual mapping was used to identify the collective and individual positions of ten emerging nations. The perceived position of the "ideal" nation also was captured by the study’s findings. FDI executives who were surveyed indicated that some emerging nations have positioned themselves strategically in terms of their availability of and access to markets and resources. The stability of a nation’s political and economic environments, as well as its business environment, also contributes to its perceived position. Some nations appear better positioned to take advantage of their strengths, whereas others face significant obstacles.

 

 

 

CRISIS PLANNING AMONG GUATEMALAN SMALL BUSINESSES: THE ASSESSMENT OF

WORST-CASE SCENARIOS

John E. Spillan, Penn State University – Dubois

William "Rick" Crandall, Concord College

Almost every type of business organization experiences crisis events. Crisis management seeks to minimize the impact of these events. While the crisis management literature is abundant concerning larger organizations in developed countries, little has been written on this subject concerning small businesses in less developed countries. This study examines the perceptions and experiences of Guatemalan small retail business owners/managers in relation to crisis events. The results indicate that a majority of these organizations do not have formal crisis management plans. Reasons for this lack of planning are offered and implications for management are presented.