Major and Minor Curriculum

Major and Minor Curriculum



Bachelor of Arts in Latin American and Latinx Studies

This major explores the context and forces that have shaped the experiences of members of Latin American societies and U.S. Latinx communities. The major engages students in the interdisciplinary study of the political, historical, socio-economic and cultural possibilities and obstacles for achieving social justice and equity; cross-cultural and intercultural understanding; respect for human integrity and dignity; and awareness of political and human rights. Students will gain an integrated understanding of two fields of growing significance: Latin American studies and the study of Latinx in the United States. (Admissions Information).
Major Advisor: Professor Brian Montes, 212.237.6809

Latin American and Latinx Studies Minor

This multi-disciplinary minor and program includes courses in the areas of history, culture, law, psychology, sociology, politics and literature relating to the experience of Puerto Rican/Latinx in the United States and of Latin Americans in the Caribbean and Latin America.
Minor Advisor: Professor Brian Montes, 212.237.6809

Latin American and Latinx Studies Honors Minor

This minor seeks to encourage and assist students enrolled to excel in all their courses by providing research and writing skills workshops as well as workshops about graduate and law school studies. Coursework is centered on Latin America and the Caribbean, Latinx in the United States as well as race and ethnicity generally in the United States. For more details contact the minor advisor.
Honors Minor Advisor: Professor Brian Montes, 212.237.6809

Minor in Latinx Literature

This minor examines U.S. Latinx authors writing in English and focuses on the four major U.S. Latinx groups – Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican – as well as other significant U.S. Latinx populations – Colombian, Peruvian, Ecuadorian, Salvadoran, and Guatemalan. While applying literary criticism and taking an interdisciplinary approach, which may also include the study of music, religion, politics, film, and the visual arts, this minor provides a well–rounded understanding of the cultural elements that contribute to U.S. Latinx Literature. In addition, this minor will enable students to develop the critical reading and writing skills essential for graduate study and careers in the law, education, public policy, writing, and government. Among the broad issues this minor will address include the following: diaspora; bilingual aesthetics; street literature; criminal and social justice; border narratives, citizenship, and the law; experiences of exile; Afro–Latinidad; Latina feminisms; queer identities; orality; and ethnicity.Minor Advisor: Professor Belinda Rincón, 212.237.8650

 

Department of Latin American and Latinx Studies

Fall 2021Course Schedule and Course Descriptions

 

LLS 124

Section 01

T/TH – 1st period

8:00am – 9:15am

Hybrid (Thursdays in person)

Professor E. Marte


Section SK 01

M/W– 4th period

12:15pm – 1:30pm

Mixed Synchronous

Professor S. Santiago

Seek Section


Section SK 02

T/TH – 1st period

3:05pm – 4:20pm

Hybrid (Tuesdays in person)

Professor D. Shaw

Seek Section


Section 03

M/W – 1st Period

8:00am – 9:15am

Hybrid ( Wednesdays in person)

Professor R. Torres


Section 04

M/W – 8th Period

7:20pm – 8:35pm

Mixed Synchronous

Professor E. Lopez


Section 05

M/W – 6th Period

4:30pm – 5:45pm

Mixed Synchronous

Professor S. Santiago

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Latinx Communities in the United States  
This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the field of Latin American and Latinx Studies focusing on the establishment and development of the diverse Latinx communities in the United States through the processes of migration, colonization, racialization, and integration. Students will explore the intersections of race, class, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality through such topics as identity formation, language rights, economic and political participation, transnationalism, law and civil rights and social justice movements.

 

LLS  130

Section 01

M/W – 3rd period 

10:50am – 12:05pm

Mixed Synchronous

Professor J. Gutierrez


Section 02

M/W – 2nd period 

9:25am – 10:40am

Mixed Synchronous

Professor J. Gutierrez


Section 04

T/TH – 7th period

5:55pm – 7:10pm

Mixed Synchronous

Professor J. Rodriguez


Section 05

M/W – 6th Period

4:30pm – 5:45pm

Hybrid (Mondays in person)

Professor N. Roman


Section 06

T/TH – 6th period

4:30pm – 5:45pm

Mixed Synchronous

Professor J. Rodriguez


Section 07

T/TH – 8th period 

7:20pm – 8:35pm

Mixed Syncrhonous

Professor J. Rodriguez

Section 08

T/TH – 4th Period

12:15pm – 1:30pm

Mixed Synchronous

Professor L. Perez


Section 09

T/TH – 2nd Period

9:25am – 10:40am

Mixed Synchronous

Professor J. Gutierrez

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction to Latin American History
This is a survey course spanning Latin America’s history from the pre-Columbian period to the recent past.  Focus is on the origins and development of Latin American social, political and economic systems, Amerindian and African peoples, the legacies of colonialism and slavery, the pursuit of nationhood and identity, the persistence of inequality, and the role of the United States in shaping the destiny of the region.

 

LLS 203
Section 01
T/TH – 5th period

3:05pm – 4:20pm

Mixed Synchronous

Professor I. Martinez

 

U.S. Latinx Identity in the 21st Century

This course is an interdisciplinary and comparative study of Latinx peoples in the United States and the factors that shape both their group identities as well as individual identities. The course will focus on factors including imperialism, colonialism, racialization, assimilation, immigration, transnationalism, regionalism, etc. and how they have shaped pan-Latinx identity as well as the identity of ethnoracial groups including Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Mexicans, Colombians, and other ethnoracial groups from Central and South America in the United States.

LLS 220
Section 01

T/TH – 2nd period

9:25am – 10:40am

Hybrid (Tuesdays in person;

Thursdays on Zoom)

Professor N. Escalera

 

Human Rights and Law in Latin America
A comparative study of human rights policies, procedures, legislation and practices in Latin American countries. The impact of international and national conventions, bills and laws on the present observance of these rights. Inquiry into morality, social justice, social and professional ethics.

*This course can be taken to satisfy requirements for the International Criminal Justice major.

LLS 242

Section 01

T/TH – 1st period

8:00am – 9:25am

Hybrid (Tuesdays on Zoom;

Thursdys in person)

Professor L. Barrios


Section 02

T/ TH – 3rd period

10:50am – 12:05pm

Hybrid (Tuesdays on Zoom;

Thursdys in person)

Professor L. Barrios

 

U.S. Foreign Policy in Latin America
(Same course as GOV 242 and POL 242 and HIS 242)
U.S. economic and political relations with Latin American countries during the 19th and 20th centuries. U.S. reactions to reform and revolutionary movements. The ideological framework of U.S. foreign policy.

 

LLS 245

Section 01

M/W – 2nd period

9:25am – 10:40am

Mixed Synchronous

Professor S. Santiago

Dominican Society and Identity

Introduction to historical, economic, political and social processes, which have contributed to the development of Dominican culture. Factors contributing to immigration, settlement patterns and social adaptation in the United States will be explored.

 

 

 

LLS 261

Section 01

T/TH – 8th period 

7:20pm – 8:35pm

Mixed Syncrhonous

Professor B. Montes

 

Revolution and Social Change in Contemporary Cuba

Analysis of political and socioeconomic development, emphasizing major approaches to social change in the 20th century. Topics covered are class structures, demographic patterns, economic dependence, democratic liberal reform, neoimperialism, the Mexican Revolution, the Cuban Revolution and new trends of the last decade. A comparative, inter-American perspective, drawing on other relevant disciplines, is used.

LLS 263

Section 01

M/W – 7th Period

5:55pm – 7:10pm

Mixed Synchronous

Professor E. Morales

Blacks in Latin America
An examination of the legacies of slavery and the Haitian Revolution in shaping the Black experience in Latin American societies, including the Dominican Republic, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Ecuador, Peru, Colombia, Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and Honduras. This course focuses on Afro-Latin Americans' construction of identity, race relations, sociocultural and political activities in different societies; and the contributions of people of African descent to Latin American societies and national identities. Readings are drawn from a variety of disciplines in the social sciences and humanities.

 

LLS 280

Section 01

M/W – 2nd Period

9:25am – 10:40am

Mixed Synchronous

Professor B. Rincon

Selected Topics in Latin American and Latinx Studies: Latinx Gothic and Horror in Literature and Film:

This course will study a significant topic of interest in the field to be chosen by the instructor.

This course examines the genres of gothic and horror in Latinx literature and film. Covering a range of sub genres, we will explore how gothic and horror reveal important insights into cultural anxieties and beliefs about death, violence, and pain. We will consider questions about what attracts humans to narratives of terror. What do gothic and horror tell us about the relationship between good and evil? What lies beneath our fear of and fascination with death and the unknown? What are the folkloric roots of scary stories and how do these tales get reiterated across generations and national borders? We will also read Latinx gothic and horror as forms of social critique and social commentary to see how they often expose – through nightmare, terror, and hauntings – the repressed urges and feelings that lurk within our culture and politics. Ultimately, the course will examine how Latinx communities experience, write about, and react to the horrific.

LLS 315

Section 01

T/TH – 5th period

3:05pm – 4:20pm

Hybrid (Thursdays in person)

Professor J. Morín

*Permission Required*

Research Methods in Latin American and Latinx Studies

 

 

This multidisciplinary course is designed to provide students with the tools necessary to critically evaluate and use the range of methodological approaches and data sources most commonly used to study Latin America and U.S. Latinx communities. The course includes both qualitative and quantitative approaches used in the social sciences, humanities, and the legal profession. The course will also guide the student through the process of conceptualizing and crafting a prospectus in his or her area of interest that will be used to conduct research during the Senior Seminar.

 

LLS 322

Section 01

T/T – 7th period

5:55pm – 7:10pm

Mixed Synchronous

Professor B. Montes

*Permission Required*

Section 02

T/TH – 4th period

11:15am – 1:30pm

Mixed Synchronous

Professor B. Montes

*Permission Required*


Section 03

M/W – 3rd period

10:50am – 12:05pm

(In-Person both days)

Professor E. Lopez


Section 04

M/W – 4th period

12:15pm – 1:30pm

(In-Person both days)

Professor E. Lopez

*Permission Required*


Section 05

M/W – 7th Period

5:55pm – 7:10pm

Hybrid (Mondays in person)

Professor N. Roman

 

Latinx Struggles for Civil Rights and Social Justice
This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of the experiences of Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans and other Latinx during the Civil Rights period. It focuses on the Latinx social movements during the 1960s and their consequences today for the struggles for civil rights and social justice of Latinx and other racial minorities in the U.S. Topics include access to education and employment; immigrant rights; detention and deportation; race and crime; Latinx and African American alliance building; Latinx citizenship and the military, and gender values and sexuality.

 

 

LLS 325

Section 01

T/TH – 3rd period

10:50am – 12:05pm

Hybrid (Tuesdays in person;

Thursdays on Zoom)

Professor N. Escalera *Permission Required*


Section 02

Fri – 3rd & 4th periods

10:50am  – 1:30 pm

Mixed Synchronous

Professor A. Bordoni


Section 03

M/W – 6th Period

4:30pm – 5:45pm

Mixed Synchronous

Professor E. Morales


Section 04

T/TH – 1st Period

8:00am – 9:25am

Hybrid (Tuesdays in person;

Thursdays on Zoom)

Professor N. Escalera

 

The Latinx Experience of Criminal Justice

This course analyzes the criminal justice system and its impact on the lives and communities of Latinx and other groups in the United States. Particular emphasis is placed on Latinx human and civil rights and the role that race, ethnicity, gender and class play in the criminal justice system. Interdisciplinary readings and class discussions center on issues such as the over-representation of Latinx and racial minorities in the criminal justice system; law and police community relations; racial profiling; stop and frisk policies; immigration status; detentions and deportations; Latinx youth; media representations; gangs; and access to education and employment and the school-to-prison-pipeline.

LLS 331

Section 99

Online- Asynchronous

Professor J. Roure

*Permission Required*

 

Experimental Learning and Latinx Communities
This course engages students in fieldwork and internship learning opportunities at community-based and government organizations and in research projects that serve Latinx communities. Course readings and assignments involve students in reflecting on their experiences and in developing a critical understanding and analyses of contemporary Latinx community issues. Students explore the meaning and significance of civic engagement and interrogate their place in and responsibility to Latinx communities. Students must participate in an internship the entire semester.

LLS 356

Section 01

T/TH – 2nd period

9:25am – 10:40am

Hybrid (Tuesdays on Zoom;

Thursdys in person)

Professor L. Barrios

Terror and Transitional Justice in Latin America

This course explores the field of transitional justice as it addresses past state violence and genocide. The course will move from an exploration of background material examining the Cold War years in Latin America to providing an in-depth analysis of the role played by truth commissions, and other strategies such as war tribunals, which seek justice and reconciliation in divided societies. We will question the root causes of violence, examine national and transnational actors, and conclude with a discussion of research methodologies used when documenting human rights abuses. The question of "forgiveness" will be also explored in the context of redress for wrongdoings.

 

LLS 363

Section 01

M/W – 1st Period

8:00am – 9:15am

Mixed Synchronous

Professor B. Rincon

 

IL-Legal Subjects: U.S. Latinx Literature & the Law
This course examines how the law shapes contemporary Latinx life in the United States. Students will examine the relationships between legal texts and literature. Latinx literature not only responds to the law, but also to its inequitable enforcement. We will read court cases, law reviews, and literary analysis in order to study the way Latinx literature exposes contradictions in the legal system. Topics covered may include the legal construction of race, the criminalization of youth, law and U.S. colonialism, violence against women, and challenges to individual civil liberties.

LLS 364

Section 01

M/W – 5th period

3:05pm – 4:20pm

(In person both days)

Professor R. Perez

 

Ethical Strains in U.S. Latinx Literature
This course will use Latina/o literature to examine the beliefs that instruct individuals' moral judgments and actions. Through a range of literary texts students will discuss the social and political issues that confront Latina/o communities: the psychological consequences of colonialism; the moral dilemmas surrounding immigration; the epistemological violence of racism and sexism; and the cultural norms that inform or constrain personal conduct. Specific topics will vary based on the instructor's specialization and will cover a range of theoretical approaches to the study of moral inquiry in Latina/o literature.

                                                                                                                                 

 

For additional information please contact:

LLS Administrative Coordinator, José Bernal at jbernal@jjay.cuny.edu 

Or the LLS Major and Minor Coordinator, Prof. Montes at bmontes@jjay.cuny.edu